Department of Anthropology

Department of Anthropology

BACHELOR (LICENSE) IN ANTHROPOLOGY (B. A.)

OBJECTIVE
If BA is focused on the theoretical, methodological and practical anthropology. You will learn in a global and comparative perspective, with various aspects of human groups, such as political, economic and religious, symbolic systems or artistic productions.

Guests have access to a wide range of courses that examine in depth different regions of the world: Mexico, the Caribbean, South America, northern Canada, Oceania, North Africa, Southeast Asia or ‘Sub-Saharan Africa. Among the various fields of specialization include the anthropology of health, conflict and violence, environment, development and ethnic minorities and indigenous studies and visual anthropology.

Abilities

A passion for cultural diversity. Wanting to better understand human beings and the societies and cultures in which they participate. Be curious, open-minded and have a deep interest for the difference in all its forms. Have a great listener, adaptation and initiative. Loving research and writing. Wanting to expand its analytical and critical mind.

Opportunity

After your anthropological training, skills and acquired skills will enable you to better know, understand and explain the multiple forms taken by contemporary societies. You will be able to analyze the social and cultural issues in areas as diverse as health, education, international development, migration or the environment. These skills, combined with the acquisition of a critical, methodological tools and synthesis and writing skills, are all assets on the labor market, regardless of the field of specialization and the sector in which you thrive.

Professions:

Development agent
Research Officer
Cultural leader
Anthropologist
Project manager
Advisor evaluation and social research
Consultant
Cooperating
Employers
Cultural centers
Research centers
Educational Institutions
Consulting firms
Ministries and public and parapublic organizations
Municipalities
Museums
Organizations (development, community, international cooperation, cultural, indigenous, etc.)
Self-employment

Opening Senior Programs
A Bachelor’s degree leads to graduate studies in anthropology or other disciplines.

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION

All requirements must be met when undertaking the program.
The applicant must meet the following requirements:

  • Be 18 years or older.
  • Hold a high school diploma (Bac II) or its equivalent.
  • Having left school early.

Applicants presenting a combination of education and relevant experience deemed equivalent to that required of the holder applicant may be eligible as a result of the analysis of the file. The program is limited enrollment, the number of places is very limited.

Selection criteria

The application is analyzed on the basis of the quality of academic record.

Laptop

In undertaking its program, the student must acquire, from the first session, a portable computer equipped with a number of software, allowing the applicant to undertake the course of his research. Proficiency in basic computer functions and common software is essential. Introductory courses to specialized software are offered outside the program.

Knowledge of French

The student admitted to the anthropology department must comply with the provisions relating to the implementation of the policy on the use of French at the University GOC.

Non-francophone candidate

The candidate whose language of instruction in primary and secondary education is not the French must demonstrate a minimum level of knowledge of the French language. His skills in written French will be assessed on arrival and, where applicable, a patch French courses could be added to its journey.

PROGRAM STRUCTURE
GRADE

Bachelor (Licence) in Anthropology (B. A.)
*This page presents the official version of the program. The University G.O.C. reserves the right to change the content without notice.

ANT – Anthropology

ANT1000               Introduction to Anthropology

ANT1001               History and theories of anthropology I

ANT1005               Anthropology of families and relatives of current

ANT1100               Anthropology language

ANT1102               Religious Anthropology

ANT1103               Anthropology of Gender

ANT1200               Anthropology of Mexico

ANT1203               Anthropology of South America

ANT1204               Caribbean Anthropology

ANT1206               Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa

ANT1207               Anthropology of Oceania

ANT1209               Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas

ANT1210               Anthropology of Morocco

ANT1305               Anthropology, food and feed

ANT1306               Anthropology of aging

ANT1500               Anthropology Inuit

ANT1501               Anthropology of Native Americans

ANT2001               History and theories of anthropology II

ANT2100               Political Anthropology

ANT2300               Health Anthropology

ANT2303               Anthropology and Environment

ANT2304               Anthropology and Development

ANT2306               urban anthropology: from the village to the global city

ANT2308               Maritime Anthropology

ANT2309               Visual Anthropology

ANT2310               Anthropology of conflicts and violence

ANT2311               Anthropology of post-socialist and socialist societies

ANT2314               consumption Anthropology

ANT2315               Anthropology, Arts and Aesthetics

ANT2316               Anthropology of moralities and ethnoéthique

ANT2317               Anthropology of forced exile and refugees

ANT2322               Anthropology of Haiti

ANT2324               Anthropology of Science and Technology

ANT3003               Contemporary Debates in Anthropology

ANT7000               Special Topics (anthropology)

ANT7001               Special Topics (anthropology)

ANT8002               Synthesis Anthropology I

ANT8003               Synthesis Anthropology II


ARL – Archaeology

ARL1105                Paleoanthropology


EHE – Studies Off-Campus

EHE1ANT              Studies – International profile – Bachelor’s degree in anthropology

EHE1IAE                Studies – International profile – Integrated Bachelor of Anthropology and Ethnology


IHP – Philosophy

PHI1127                Philosophical Anthropology

PHI2901                Questions cosmology and philosophical anthropology over evil

PHI7503                Philosophical Anthropology


SCR – Religious

SCR2103                Religious Anthropologies


THL – Theology

THL2300               Anthropology of spiritual awakening

THL6010               Seminar spiritual anthropology

THL6061               Biblical Anthropology and catechesis spirituality

TRACKING PROGRAM (90 credits)

ANTHROPOLOGY 36 CREDITS

Common requirements
ANT-1000: Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Understanding human diversity and complexity of social and cultural processes by ethnography, comparative analysis and critical thinking. Presentation of theoretical trends and themes of the anthropological approach: religion, belief systems, kinship, social hierarchy, political, economy, environment, globalization. Illustration by numerous ethnographic examples.

ANT-1001: History and theories of anthropology I (3 credits)

Description

Trace the emergence and analyze the evolution of knowledge and anthropological discourse in relation to scientific production in general; analyze the main theoretical and methodological currents and anthropological debates and place them in their socio-political context; highlighting the continuities and changes in the discipline.

ANT-1002: Survey Methodology and Ethnography (3 credits)
Description

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic anthropological research techniques in their theoretical and practical aspects, and the process of research: ethnography, reading files, desk research, field research ; ethical and practical research; Working enforcement techniques.

ANT-2000: Theories of Culture (3 credits)

Description

Historical overview and critical examination of the concept of culture in anthropology. Getting to the currents and the major concepts that have contributed to improve the analysis and understanding of the meanings and cultural phenomena; Special attention is paid to a semiotic approach to culture and the interpretive approach. Faced with globalization, reflections on the circulation of cultural signs and some contemporary uses the concept of culture.

ANT-1004: analysis of qualitative data Methods (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on the analysis of textual qualitative data from documentary materials, open interviews, direct observations or visual materials. The thematic content analysis, structural analysis of the data and the case study are the three main methods discussed. In addition to a theoretical reflection on qualitative methods, the course emphasizes practical learning analyzes with the support of textual data analysis software such as N’Vivo software.

ANT-2001: History and theories of anthropology II (3 credits)

Description

This course allows the student to become familiar with the currents of the anthropology that are in a critical perspective questioning the relations between powers, ideologies and economies. Analysis of the concepts and approaches of critical topics, including historical materialism, feminist perspectives and rereading the classics by the postmodern.

ANT-3000: Practical Training I (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to a particular workplace through appropriate literature review. Gradual integration in a workgroup. Acknowledgment of group activities and work in progress. When to enroll in the course, students should immediately contact the head teacher to obtain instructions regarding the choice of practical training.

ANT-3001: Practical Training II (3 credits)

Description

Implementing the work plan on the terms put forward in practical training I. The work projects vary but should include tasks in which students can take advantage of one or more research techniques experienced in framework of techniques and methods courses.

ANT-3002: Practical training III (3 credits)

Description

Writing a work report with regard to the initial objectives and critical assessment of the experience of practical training.

ANT-3003: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to consolidate and expand theoretical and conceptual achievements of students by reviewing recent theoretical trends concerning anthropological debates and current social issues.

ANT-3004: Epistemology and reflexivity (3 credits)

Description

Acquire and develop critical thinking about the possibilities and limitations of the assumptions of the production of anthropological knowledge in general; objectifying of anthropological knowledge and the will to act on the world; subjectivant of anthropological knowledge and possible incursions in consciousness; understanding other rationalities.

ANT-3090: Land and anthropological practices (3 credits)

Description

This compulsory course is designed to complement the cycle of methodological training BA in Anthropology. Its overall objective is to take stock of the overall training and achieve a synthesis of methodological knowledge and practices. This course allows the student to reflect on a few major issues of contemporary anthropology, on co-production of anthropological knowledge, the anthropologist profession and the professional project. It aims to question the very diverse contexts in which the work of the anthropologist inscribed on its social responsibility on the content and scope of its involvement and its commitment to the group he works with, and lastly on the ethical dimensions of anthropologist profession.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS:PROGRAM CREDITS- 54
REQUIREMENT 1-9 AMONG CREDITS

Cultures and societies

ANT-1200: Anthropology of Mexico (3 credits)

Description


Introduction to ethnology and social and cultural dimensions of the contemporary Mexican political economy. General familiarity with a number of anthropological concepts and to the following topics: indigenous peoples and their pre-Columbian roots, the relationship between genders and between generations, social change linked to the development and the context of globalization.

ANT-1201: Culture, history, identity facets of contemporary Haiti (3 credits)

Description


Introduction to an overview of Haiti by outlining its historical development using an analytical framework showing the impact of the practices associated with the Indirect Rule. Placing of these characteristics by presenting the development phases. Analyzes the political, economic, social and cultural of contemporary Haiti. Presentation of the main currents of interpretation of Haitian society and the contribution of anthropology.

ANT-1202: Sub-Saharan Africa: Cultural Diversity and Globalization (3 credits)

Description


Covering a broad spectrum of social and cultural phenomena, this course provides an understanding of the diversity of African societies south of the Sahara. It explores modes of action and organization of these companies through thematic analysis (urbanization, migration, youth, civil society, links between religion and politics, conflicts, etc.), allowing better identify the interactions between the local, regional and global.

ANT-1203: Anthropology of South America (3 credits)

Description


The course focuses on the Andean America, particularly in Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru. Among the topics covered include: the Conquest and colonization yesterday today; gender relations, kinship, family, household; Indianness and social movements; globalization, development and human rights; food and health problems; rural, urban and migration; guerrillas, illegal crops, drug trafficking and repression.

ANT-1204: Caribbean Anthropology (3 credits)

Description


The overall aim of the course is to introduce the student to the historical, economic, political and cultural of the Caribbean cultural area. Special attention is devoted to the influence of the colonial past on the social organization and the contemporary local cultures, both in the French Antilles and Spanish than English. The course deals with the Native American population, of colonial domination and the slave trade, colored ideologies, the plantation system, slave rebellions, the kinship system and matrifocality, traditional religions, including voodoo, the Rastafarianism and new fundamentalist religions.

ANT-1205: Companies and Southeast Asia cultures of yesterday and today (3 credits)

Description


This course introduces the student to a broad and vibrant cultural area 560 million explored by prominent anthropologists (Firth, Leach, Mead, Geertz Condominas Dournes). We study different societies, their history, their cultures and their contemporary adaptation into two large divisions characteristics of this region: the mainland, where prevailing Buddhism and linguistic fragmentation (Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam), and maritime, Austronesian and predominantly Muslim (Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Timor).

ANT-1206: Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa (3 credits)

Description


General Introduction to Cultural Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa. This course emphasizes the cultural diversity of the region and covers the following topics: Islam and religious diversity; relations with the West; the crisis of modernity; Arab renaissance; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; women and feminism; Sufism and spirituality.

ANT-1207: Anthropology of Oceania (3 credits)

Description


Acquire basic knowledge of anthropological and historical part of Oceania, since the colonial encounter and postcolonial period to the current changes and challenges; be familiar with the main themes ethnological and cultural, social, religious and political traditional and contemporary Pacific societies.

ANT-1208: Brazil plural (3 credits)

Description


Introduction to the diversity which is the Brazilian company and major social challenges it is currently facing. This course seeks to capture the specificity of the Brazilian response to cultural diversity and discusses the main tools developed by anthropology to understand this diversity by using the work of Brazilian anthropologists and specialists from Brazil. It particularly explores the relationship of Brazilian society to indigenous populations, the influence of the legacy of slavery in contemporary Brazil and how violence is a feature of the Brazilian social structure.

ANT-1209: Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas (3 credits)

Description


Introduction to Anthropology of the Himalayan world in its historical, religious, political and social. Understanding of the cultural diversity of these high altitude peoples from the foothills of Pakistan to the Sino-Tibetan marches, through Nepal, Bhutan and Tibet. Critical reflection on the impact of political upheavals, for sixty years, have profoundly changed the daily lives of these people (integration of large nation-states where they are considered minorities).

ANT-1210: Anthropology of Morocco (3 credits)

Description


This course is divided into three parts. The first concerns the examination of the historical conditions that led to the emergence of Morocco as a nation state. A second proposes an anthropological introduction to the ethnic, religious and political of Morocco, a country at the crossroads of three worlds: Africa, the Middle East, Europe. Finally, a third carries an anthropological perspective on contemporary Morocco. Among other anthropological work carried out in Morocco, we linger over those of Geertz, V. Crapanzano, P. Rabinow, J. Berque, E. Westermarck, E. Gellner, R. Jamous, A. Hammoudi.

ANT-1211: Highlands of Southeast Asia and South-West China (3 credits)

Description


Introduction to critical anthropology of Highlands companies southeast Asia and south-western China which include a dozen countries where more than 100 million people with genetic heritages, historical, linguistic, cultural , religious and political extreme diversity, which makes it a fascinating subject for discipline.

ANT-1400: Transitions post-socialist Asia (3 credits)
Description

The course first considers that were socialist regimes of Asia at their peak (China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Mongolia, some former USSR republics): ideology, history, social organization and political system approached from an anthropological angle, considering such individuals-state relations or memory and forgetting collective violence. The course then analyzes the new challenges that these countries face since their transition to a market economy policies, new social inequalities transformations, development of a consumer culture, religious revival, development and tourism, environmental challenges.

ANT-1500: Inuit Anthropology (3 credits)
Description


Introduction to Anthropology Inuit before and after contact with Qallunaat (whites). Geographic overview, economic structures, social, political and ideological. Particular importance to the Inuit of Nunavik, Nunavut and the rest of the Canadian Arctic. The course aims to stimulate reflection about the relationship between Quebec and Canada and the aboriginal society.

ANT-1501: Native American Anthropology (3 credits)

Description


Critical Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology of the Amerindian populations, with particular emphasis on the Northeast region. The course includes a description of traditional structures on the economic, social, political and ideological. This description is accompanied by an analysis of the impact that the contact with Europeans and Euro-Canadians on these structures and a presentation of Native American efforts to overcome the negative effects of these contacts.

ANT-1600: The Caribbean: religion, health and artistic expressions (3 credits)

Description


This course is an introduction to the Caribbean. It deals with slavery and its colonial past and its influence on the current religious practices and magico-therapeutic (Haitian voodoo, Obeah St Lucia, Cuban Santeria). It then discusses the multiple component waves of migration of its population. The arts and literature are used to illustrate these elements.

ANT-1701: Introduction to aboriginal peoples of Canada (3 credits)

Description


This course is a general introduction to Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit, Indians and Métis. It offers a general picture of the historical, sociological, economic and cultural rights while giving an important place to speak of indigenous themselves to deconstruct related stereotypes.

ANT-1770: Summer School on Aboriginal Peoples (3 credits)

Description


This intensive training is designed to bring together various participants, students and professionals, to address key issues of indigenous peoples. Each edition of this summer school is built around a theme chosen for its relevance and its importance for the future of indigenous communities. The focus is on Aboriginal Nations of Quebec and Canada, but the current comparative approach also leads participants to discuss other Aboriginal peoples of Canada (Métis, Inuit) and elsewhere in the world. Throughout the course, the focus is on exchange with the speakers and among participants.

ANT-2200: Thailand and Vietnam in mirror (3 credits)

Description


Neighbors in Southeast Asia mainland, Thailand and Vietnam are very dissimilar culturally. They belong to two distinct language families; different religions and philosophies have taken root there; and the barrier of the Annamite chain promoted heterogeneous historical course. To see clearly, this course offers a dynamic comparison of these two countries. It provides a general introduction, from an anthropological point of view, these two representatives of the Indian and Chinese heritages in “Indo-China.”

REQUIREMENTS 2-30 AMONG CREDITS

Specialized research

ANT-1005: Anthropology families and relatives of current (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the new family forms from an anthropological perspective. After affiliation of international adoption or assisted reproduction, created alliances through marriages arranged remotely proliferation of blended families, single parents or same-sex, all these apparently new forms of “doing family” went under the microscope of knowledge Ethnographic to examine the continuity and rupture elements that underlie them.

ANT-1100: Language Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the diversity of languages and their analysis. Relations between anthropological theory and linguistic theory. Introduction to research on the role of language in culture and society (sociolinguistics, ethno-linguistic, ethnosémantique).

ANT-1101: Evolution, genetics and human identity (3 credits)

Description
vIntroduction to theories of evolution and human genetics and overview of their social impacts. Analysis of the influence of scientific theories and pseudo-scientific theories of evolution on conceptions of identity of human beings. The impacts of theories Improvement, degeneration, similarity and difference are discussed with a look that is both historic and contemporary. The course focuses on emerging theories called biosocial anthropology. [/su_note]

ANT-1102: Religious Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Studying the history of relations between the concepts of culture, religion and ideology in anthropology; become familiar with the various concepts of anthropology of religions (myths, rituals, cosmology, polytheism, shamanism, etc.); question of religious diversity; reflect on the ideological and religious dimensions of contemporary societies.

ANT-1103: Anthropology of gender (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to convey basic knowledge about feminism as a social movement, as well as feminism and “gender” as approaches conceptual and methodological. It leads to better understand the major impact of feminist approaches and gender anthropology, and the contribution of anthropology to the understanding of gender relations.

ANT-1302: Ethnomedicine ethnopsychiatry and (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course covers the diversity of approaches developed in ethnomedicine, which falls discipline of anthropology. One of the major goals of ethno-medicine is to better understand the nature and the conditions of possibility of systems of meaning, knowledge and action about the disease and the ordering of the world. The course thus illustrates the polysemy (multiple meanings), the multidimensionality (multiple determinants) and polyphony (multiple voices) constituent explanatory models and practices put forward in different societies. We examine the scope and limits of the fundamental conceptual tools ethnomedicine by subjecting them to the empirical through three case studies disease and representation systems in Morocco; culture, sexual health and masculinity in India; culture and mental health of asylum seekers in Canada.

ANT-1304: Sexualities and Cultures (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to better understand how sex and gender are social and cultural constructions. To achieve this, it illustrates the cultural and historical diversity of sexual practices and discourses on sexuality and gender. In doing so, the course raises a critical distance from the as sexuality conceived in the West and explores the close ties between practices, sexual discourse and political and economic issues.

ANT-1305: Anthropology, food and nutrition (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to provide an introduction to the study of food, nutrition and food anthropology. Various topics are covered, which explore the links between food and identity, symbolic systems and rituals, memory, the relation to the body, the environment, including through the production, consumption and management.

ANT-1306: Anthropology of aging (3 credits)

Description

This course explores and analyzes how different types of aging are built and governed in our societies. It aims to problematize the relationship between public policy, scientific research and social groups in the production categories and their attributes, as well as some of the unintended effects of this production.

ANT-1307: Ethnography dynamic interaction (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on the analysis of the dynamic interaction between humans worldwide. The language and social communication parameters are studied. How ethnographer reports, while being dependent, of these mechanisms is the heart of the proposed reflection. Methodological tools are suggested to address the unspoken provided the statement, speaking out as far as the delegation of representation to a spokesman, and so on. Specific cases to understanding the role of common phenomena in social life as gossip, insults, greetings, etc.

ANT-1401: Popular Culture and Globalization (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to familiarize students with the major theories of cultural globalization processes and analysis of contemporary popular culture (including Cultural Studies, Frankfurt School). Using varied cultural backgrounds ethnographic illustrations on music, film and television mainly, students are encouraged to reflect on the Conservative or emancipatory role of these means of expression, their mobilization to for identity claim and the persistence of borders (actual, imagined) within cultural globalization.

ANT-1490: Inuit Language and Culture (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to certain practices and representations characterizing the Inuit past and present through the study of their language and cultural expression. This course is not a course of conversation or Inuit grammar, but an overview of some semantic categories particularly important, as well as their translation into Inuit language.

ANT-1500: Inuit Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to Anthropology Inuit before and after contact with Qallunaat (whites). Geographic overview, economic structures, social, political and ideological. Particular importance to the Inuit of Nunavik, Nunavut and the rest of the Canadian Arctic. The course aims to stimulate reflection about the relationship between Quebec and Canada and the aboriginal society.

ANT-1501: Native American Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Critical Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology of the Amerindian populations, with particular emphasis on the Northeast region. The course includes a description of traditional structures on the economic, social, political and ideological. This description is accompanied by an analysis of the impact that the contact with Europeans and Euro-Canadians on these structures and a presentation of Native American efforts to overcome the negative effects of these contacts.

ANT-1502: Indigenous Movements: recognition and international dynamics (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of indigenous movements and their socio-historical contexts of emergence, especially internationally. Analysis of the recognition of the “indigenous” category on the world stage and institutionalization of indigenous rights, including through the work of the UN. Scan of the use of indigenous rights in various parts of the world as well as some common concerns for indigenous peoples as they are based locally.

ANT-1601: socio-political and human issues of migration (3 credits)

Description

Migration often approached from a quantitative and instrumental angle is studied here based on real situations of complex conditions of migration processes and the experience of those involved. This course aims to promote reflection of the person rubs or will mingle, people from different cultural backgrounds to hers.

ANT-1602: Body, suffering and pain (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to stimulate reflection in students on its body design and its relationship to suffering and pain. The human body is always “worked” by own practices at a time and a place. This diversity can pose unexpected problems for the questioner that must touch or handle it.

ANT-1701: Introduction to aboriginal peoples of Canada (3 credits)

Description

This course is a general introduction to Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit, Indians and Métis. It offers a general picture of the historical, sociological, economic and cultural rights while giving an important place to speak of indigenous themselves to deconstruct related stereotypes.

ANT-1751: Anthropological Perspectives on Islam (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological reading of Islam as a religion, such as discursive tradition and system of meaning, knowledge and actions. It deals, among others: the historical and theological complexities of Islam; Islam as dealt with by anthropologists; theological, cultural and political dimensions of various realities such as immigration post.
September 2011; Muslim woman as subject or object as a cultural and political face veil, polygamy and contraception; the links between mental health and symbolic thought; the contemplative Sufi and Sufism action.

ANT-1770: Summer School on Aboriginal Peoples (3 credits)

Description

This intensive training is designed to bring together various participants, students and professionals, to address key issues of indigenous peoples. Each edition of this summer school is built around a theme chosen for its relevance and its importance for the future of indigenous communities. The focus is on Aboriginal Nations of Quebec and Canada, but the current comparative approach also leads participants to discuss other Aboriginal peoples of Canada (Métis, Inuit) and elsewhere in the world. Throughout the course, the focus is on exchange with the speakers and among participants.

ANT-2100: Political Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course examines the contributions of anthropology to our understanding of policy forms in societies. It takes as its starting point a number of classic studies of the process of organizing power and sense of reports in several non-Western societies, studies that have contributed to the articulation of anthropological perspectives on the policy. These studies and perspectives are drawn upon to illuminate the nature of power relations in the world today. The pedagogical approach of the course is varied and focused on achieving individual research on a topic related to the course.

ANT-2101: From potlatch on the stock exchange: anthropological decoding of the economy (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the reproduction of the companies in view of their utilitarian and symbolic relationship with the physical world. One of them critically explores the classic subjects like the potlatch and the gift, universalist theories like Marxism and neo-liberalism, as well as current topics such relocation, the stock exchange and fair trade.

ANT-2300: Health Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to introduce students to the analysis of health and disease phenomena in a global and systemic perspective where, society, culture and environment interact. It also aims learning of the main theoretical concepts and models through a series of concrete examples from Haitian and international research. It covers topics such as the influence of culture on biomedical and popular diagnostic categories, popular knowledge related to the causes and treatments of disease, public health and international health issues of immigrant populations.

ANT-2301: peasantry and globalizations (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the features of the peasantry at large and certain national or transnational peasant and the transformations they have experienced in the context of technological change, urbanization, modernization, globalization and international migration. Considering the concept of peasantry as an object constructed by the social sciences but also as an identity that social actors can reclaim, the course also deals with dynamic and agrarian, food and social struggles of the peasantry during the twentieth century at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

ANT-2302: Minorities and Ethnicity (3 credits)

Description

The course travels the world to find the logic of sustainability of contemporary ethnic minorities. It explores the anthropological reflection on the concepts of minority, ethnicity, identity, transnational, multicultural societies and diasporas. It questions the origins of these concepts and state the structural elements as much deconstructing the discourse of the minority than the majority. The student is able to case studies of contemporary ethnic minorities (indigenous peoples, national minorities, migrants, refugees) and the issues they face.

ANT-2303: Anthropology and Environment (3 credits)

Description

Emergence and consolidation of the anthropology of the environment through its various conceptual currents. Analysis joints between environmental issues and companies. Study different dimensions of environmental dynamics (social, cultural, economic, political, symbolic, gender) using ethnographic examples. Analysis of aspects and implications of management and environmental conservation.

ANT-2304: Anthropology and Development (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological approaches to development and its multiple dimensions examined in terms of globalization, modernity, and links between the “local” and “global”. Specificity of the anthropological approach, both in terms of issues than on methods. Thematic debates.

ANT-2306: Urban Anthropology: the village to the global city (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces to the city as a place to work, live, production, construction and social and cultural transformation, and the relationship between town and country, through an approach that primarily uses the history and ethnography. Different theoretical and methodological perspectives that marked the urban anthropological research are discussed. Among the topics presented include urbanization in countries of the North and South, rural-urban migration, sociospatiaux divisions, urban agriculture and urban social movements.

ANT-2307: Contemporary Aboriginal Issues (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to analyze the main contemporary topical issues relating to indigenous peoples. The focus is on Aboriginal claims and political struggles, the assertion places and appropriation, as well as social and political issues of the communities. Then, this course takes as its starting point the status of Native Americans to treat the condition and aspirations of indigenous peoples of the world, both from a comparative point of view and from the perspective of the claims and joint mobilizations On the international scene.

ANT-2308: Maritime Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Emergence and consolidation of the maritime anthropology in social anthropology. Social, economic, political and technical in fishing and coastal activities. Links between artisanal, industrial fishing and aquaculture. Place new dimensions in the coastal dynamics. Issues and challenges in the management and development of coastal resources and the role of international agencies.

ANT-2309: Visual Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Overview of the history of visual anthropology and its relationship with the development of cinema. Nanook to Atanarjuat: visualization and critical of several classic ethnographic films. Examination of different preferred approaches to documentary ethnocinéma: illustrate, describe, provoke, experiment and represent. Reflection on the image and reality, the relationship to the images and on the factory look. From the artwork to the digital image, photography to reality TV, the image conflicts with the knowledge and power. Review of some contemporary debates around this particular form of Anthropology writing. Presentations and filmic sequences presentation by students.

ANT-2310: Anthropology of conflicts and violence (3 credits)

Description

Introduce students to the field of conflict studies, violence and conflict resolution from an anthropological perspective. Present the main concepts, theories and methodological and analytical tools. Analyze the forms, nature and causes of conflicts (inter-community and international) based on case studies in different regions of the world.

ANT-2311: Anthropology of Socialists and post-socialist societies (3 credits)

Description

The course focuses on the specific relationships between social actors and the state in socialist countries as well as the continuation of such relations in the post-socialist countries. He studies the historical transformations that have marked these societies, States and the nature of governance and social organization and social movements. The course covers these topics by applying them to different countries including Eastern Europe, Cuba, China and Vietnam, bringing special attention to the problems and characteristics peculiar to them.

ANT-2312: Native Cosmologies (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of Amerindian and Inuit cosmologies. Study of these religious systems in their traditional and contemporary forms. The course presents both the unity and diversity of these traditions, but especially their resilience and adaptation following the irruption of Christianity and modernity.

ANT-2314: consumption of Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course is an overview of the different approaches, thematic and empirical research is now coasting around the questions and issues that affect consumption. The study of the evolution of consumer culture and consumption practices provoked by capitalism in different regions of the world, is considered a preferred gateway to the contemporary world. It examines the transformation of practices and local and global discourse on consumption of goods through different space-time and especially in the context of globalization. The structural conditions of their arrival, their symbolic dimension, identity, statutory and social production (as defined in Setha Low) of the consumer, the moral economy and civic and political dimension of consumption are all topics being quarter.

ANT-2315: Anthropology, arts and aesthetics (3 credits)

Description

This course begins with an overview of the main approaches of the anthropology of art, focusing for example the status of primitive art, the symbolic visual language, the power of objects or the expressive power music, dance and performance. It continues with a deepening of anthropology of aesthetics, addressing the role of the beautiful and appearances in social life, the constitution of the experience of self and the world through the sensory, or labor mobilization Aesthetics in ritual efficacy.

ANT-2316: Anthropology and moralities ethnoéthique (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on various issues. What are the conceptions of morality in different cultures? What are its borders, its interfaces with religious or political? What values and social norms into play? And especially how, in everyday life, are built moral reasoning? By what process, and on what basis, do we judge the moral acceptability of such behavior towards his children, relatives, religious or civil authorities? What meaning can we give to morality “secular” or “popular”? The concept of “common morality” proposed by some ethicists did sense?

ANT-2317: Anthropology of forced exile and refugees (3 credits)

Description

The course suggests a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of forced exile. It looks at the contributions of anthropology, law and transcultural psychiatry to a better understanding of the causes and consequences of forced migration. These causes and these consequences are examined through case studies, both in terms of sending and receiving societies (political, institutions, governmental and non-governmental organizations) to individuals (suffering, reconstruction).

ANT-2319: Social Imaginary (3 credits)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of imagination and such speech they are used in social anthropology. Anthropological Perspectives on various figures of the social imagination as utopia, the ethnofiction, prophecy or fear as elements of political languages. Comparative and critical examination of the relationship between power and discursive productions, performances and between institutions.

ANT-2320: Mobility and language practice (3 credits)

Description

Language practices change from childhood to adulthood at the option of cognitive development and the circumstances of everyday life. Most people also face various forms of spatial mobility and symbolic practices that influence their language throughout their lives. So is it on Migration, relocation for professional purposes, etc. So language socialization is an ongoing process that explains the momentary abandonment of languages by individuals, but also their persistence over time and beyond the borders of the collective point of view.

ANT-2321: anthropological approach of the colonial situation (3 credits)

Description

This course is part of a renewed interest in Europe and North America, to the colonial question among anthropologists as among historians. From a critical perspective and a renewed dialogue between history and anthropology, this is to compare the approaches to colonialism and to identify the conceptual and methodological tools useful for its analysis. Special situations are examined to better understand the colonization and structural realities.

ANT-2322: Haiti in Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course is addressed in a historical perspective. The critical study of texts and ethnographic context of their production, he recounts how Haiti was once the “other” perfect object of ethnographic studies, particularly on the part of American researchers. It also analyzes the development of the Haitian anthropology and what characterizes it in relation to these pioneering work and other influences, at the confluence of Anglo-American and French traditions.

ANT-2323: Cultural Hegemony and resistors (3 credits)

Description

In the field of anthropology of power, this course reveals first, then tries to interpret the forms of cultural hegemony – in the sense of Antonio Gramsci – as well as forms of resistance to this hegemony in the world . These resistances are expressed in all forms: social movements, environmentalists and pacifists projects, fair trade, union, legal claims, infra, resistance “everyday” denounced by public display, use of microcredit, social-election plans Democrats, boycotts and strikes.

ANT-2324: Anthropology of Science and Technology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the field of study of science and technology. Analysis of the impact of science and technology in modern society and the reciprocal influence of science on contemporary societies: a study of their co-production. Situation of science and technology studies at the intersection of multiple disciplines and highlighting the contributions of anthropologists and the implications of the search box on anthropological methods and theories.

ANT-2500: Indigenous Thematic I (3 credits)

Description

This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of a seminar and a forum for exchange and reflection where researchers, indigenous studies specialists come to present various facets of their research on topics such as political claims, territorial and identity, health, the economy and development, religious and ritual dynamics in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies.

ANT-2501: Indigenous Thematic II (3 credits)

Description

This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of formal presentations or seminars during which researchers and possibly of Native Studies specialists present various aspects of their research or their interventions on issues such as political claims, territorial and identity , health, economy and development, or the religious and ritual dynamics, or located in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies.

ANT-2502: Indigenous Thematic III (3 credits)

Description

This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of formal presentations or seminars during which researchers and possibly of Native Studies specialists present various aspects of their research or their interventions on issues such as political claims, territorial and identity , health, economy and development, or the religious and ritual dynamics, or located in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies.

ANT-2600: anthropological themes I (3 credits)

Description

This course allows a professor of the Department of Anthropology or a guest professor to present a theme of his choice and to deepen it for an entire session.

ANT-2601: Anthropological Topics II (3 credits)

Description

This course allows a professor of the Department of Anthropology or a guest professor to present a theme of his choice and to deepen it for an entire session.

ETN-1004: Introduction to Material Culture (3 credits)

Description

This course is a review of techniques used to meet the material needs necessary for human survival by showing customs, practices and behaviors traditionally associated with these processes. Evidence in the form of gestures, objects, customs and stories, are considered in relation to physical and human environment: it will report the time of contexts and places, ethnic contributions, similarities and differences in the various Francophone communities in North America.

ETN-3001: Tourism and Heritage (3 credits)

Description

Tourism is growing as an operator change in economic, social and cultural. It plays a key role in the promotion and recognition of local cultures and the highlighting of cultural diversity across the world. Cultural tourism, including heritage, occupies a central place in urban and tourism policies of host countries. By putting heritage at the forefront of tourism, they take advantage of their openness to international tourism to present themselves as authentic and distinctive destinations.

SOC-1001: Data Analysis I (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to quantitative data analysis techniques: paintings contingencies bivariate and multivariate, regression analysis, using SPSS with instructions. This course is a prerequisite in Analysis II data.

OTHER COURSES

ANT-2740: Directed Readings I (3 credits)

Description

This course enables students to deepen their knowledge on a topic that particularly interested to pursue a literature search, to familiarize themselves with a new theme or gradually become part of a research team by readings in the supervision of a teacher. Before enrolling, the student must have obtained the agreement of the teacher who will oversee it.

ANT-3400: Directed Readings II (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to enable students to deepen their knowledge on a topic that particularly interested to pursue a literature search, to familiarize themselves with a new theme or gradually become part of a team Search by readings taken under the supervision of a teacher. Before enrolling, the student must have obtained the agreement of a teacher for supervision.
REQUIREMENT 3-3 AMONG CREDITS TO 6:

ANL-2020: Intermediate English II (3 credits)

Description

Advanced intermediate level course designed for students who can express themselves both orally and in writing in simple everyday situations and who can read and write relatively simple texts. Oral comprehension and writing; oral and written expression. Grammatical structures, vocabulary and idioms, pronunciation. .

ANL-3010: Advanced English I (3 credits)

Description

Advanced course designed for students who have relatively little difficulty understanding and expressing themselves adequately but need to enrich their grammatical and lexical knowledge. Oral comprehension and writing; oral and written expression. Grammatical structures, vocabulary and idioms, pronunciation. .

ANL-3011: Intensive English IV (6 credits)
Description

Intensive English Second Language advanced intermediate level. Content: grammar in context, listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, written expression. .

ANL-3020: Advanced English II (3 credits)
Description

Advanced course designed for students who wish to improve their oral and written English. This course aims to bring students to express themselves correctly both orally and in writing and to pursue higher studies in English. .

ANL-3021: Intensive English V (6 credits)
Description

Intensive English second language courses at the advanced level. Content: grammar in context, listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, written expression. .

ANL-3030: Advanced English III (3 credits)
Description

Advanced course for people who have a good knowledge of English and want to improve their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in oral and written.

ANL-3031: Intensive English VI (6 credits)

Description

Intensive English courses Second Language level. Content: grammar in context, oral comprehension, written comprehension, written expression.

ANL-3040: Advanced English IV (3 credits)

Description

Advanced course for people who have a very good knowledge of English and want to improve it further. Content: oral and written expression related texts on various topics, vocabulary, language levels, as required by the grammar group.
To graduate, students must reach level Advanced English I (TOEIC: 750). It can choose courses of another modern language if the level Advanced English III (TOEIC: 900) is already acquired.
REQUIREMENT 4-9 AMONG TO 12 CREDITS:

LP-3610: Internship in the Haitian public service (3 credits)

Description

Paid training to acquire practical work experience in the Haitian public service, in an area closely related to bachelor’s degrees in the Faculty of Social Sciences. This course, lasting about 225 hours, must be approved by the program director at registration. The assessment is made by the internship supervisor and environment on the basis of a placement report. or from the courses bearing the initials ARL, CIN, CRI, COM, ECN, ETN, GGR, HST, LIT, LNG, MSL, IHP, POL, PSY, SCR, SOC or SVS (excluding those in the series 800) and modern language other than English.

The student who has chosen this concentration must meet the requirements.[/su_note]

MERGER ENVIRONMENT 48 CREDITS

Practical training (ANT-3000 ANT-3002) must focus on the environmental field.

ANT-2303: Anthropology and Environment (3 credits)

Description

Emergence and consolidation of the anthropology of the environment through its various conceptual currents. Analysis joints between environmental issues and companies. Study different dimensions of environmental dynamics (social, cultural, economic, political, symbolic, gender) using ethnographic examples. Analysis of aspects and implications of management and environmental conservation.

CULTURES AND SOCIETIES

ANT-1200: Anthropology of Mexico (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to ethnology and social and cultural dimensions of the contemporary Mexican political economy. General familiarity with a number of anthropological concepts and to the following topics: indigenous peoples and their pre-Columbian roots, the relationship between genders and between generations, social change linked to the development and the context of globalization.
ANT-1201: Culture, history, identity facets of contemporary Haiti (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to an overview of Haiti by outlining its historical development using an analytical framework showing the impact of the practices associated with the Indirect Rule. Placing of these characteristics by presenting the development phases. Analyzes the political, economic, social and cultural of contemporary Haiti. Presentation of the main currents of interpretation of Haitian society and the contribution of anthropology.

ANT-1202: Sub-Saharan Africa: Cultural Diversity and Globalization (3 credits)

Description

Covering a broad spectrum of social and cultural phenomena, this course provides an understanding of the diversity of African societies south of the Sahara. It explores modes of action and organization of these companies through thematic analysis (urbanization, migration, youth, civil society, links between religion and politics, conflicts, etc.), allowing better identify the interactions between the local, regional and global.

ANT-1203: Anthropology of South America (3 credits)

Description

The course focuses on the Andean America, particularly in Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru. Among the topics covered include: the Conquest and colonization yesterday today; gender relations, kinship, family, household; Indianness and social movements; globalization, development and human rights; food and health problems; rural, urban and migration; guerrillas, illegal crops, drug trafficking and repression.

ANT-1204: Caribbean Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

The overall aim of the course is to introduce the student to the historical, economic, political and cultural of the Caribbean cultural area. Special attention is devoted to the influence of the colonial past on the social organization and the contemporary local cultures, both in the French Antilles and Spanish than English. The course deals with the Native American population, of colonial domination and the slave trade, colored ideologies, the plantation system, slave rebellions, the kinship system and matrifocality, traditional religions, including voodoo, the Rastafarianism and new fundamentalist religions.

ANT-1205: Companies and Southeast Asia cultures of yesterday and today(3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the student to a broad and vibrant cultural area 560 million explored by prominent anthropologists (Firth, Leach, Mead, Geertz Condominas Dournes). We study different societies, their history, their cultures and their contemporary adaptation into two large divisions characteristics of this region: the mainland, where prevailing Buddhism and linguistic fragmentation (Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam), and maritime, Austronesian and predominantly Muslim (Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and Timor).

ANT-1206: Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa (3 credits)

Description

General Introduction to Cultural Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa. This course emphasizes the cultural diversity of the region and covers the following topics: Islam and religious diversity; relations with the West; the crisis of modernity; Arab renaissance; the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; women and feminism; Sufism and spirituality.

ANT-1207: Anthropology of Oceania (3 credits)

Description

Acquire basic knowledge of anthropological and historical part of Oceania, since the colonial encounter and postcolonial period to the current changes and challenges; be familiar with the main themes ethnological and cultural, social, religious and political traditional and contemporary Pacific societies.

ANT-1208: Brazil plural (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the diversity which is the Brazilian company and major social challenges it is currently facing. This course seeks to capture the specificity of the Brazilian response to cultural diversity and discusses the main tools developed by anthropology to understand this diversity by using the work of Brazilian anthropologists and specialists from Brazil. It particularly explores the relationship of Brazilian society to indigenous populations, the influence of the legacy of slavery in contemporary Brazil and how violence is a feature of the Brazilian social structure.

ANT-1209: Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to Anthropology of the Himalayan world in its historical, religious, political and social. Understanding of the cultural diversity of these high altitude peoples from the foothills of Pakistan to the Sino-Tibetan marches, through Nepal, Bhutan and Tibet. Critical reflection on the impact of political upheavals, for sixty years, have profoundly changed the daily lives of these people (integration of large nation-states where they are considered minorities).

ANT-1210: Anthropology of Morocco (3 credits)
Description

This course is divided into three parts. The first concerns the examination of the historical conditions that led to the emergence of Morocco as a nation state. A second proposes an anthropological introduction to the ethnic, religious and political of Morocco, a country at the crossroads of three worlds: Africa, the Middle East, Europe. Finally, a third carries an anthropological perspective on contemporary Morocco. Among other anthropological work carried out in Morocco, we linger over those of Geertz, V. Crapanzano, P. Rabinow, J. Berque, E. Westermarck, E. Gellner, R. Jamous, A. Hammoudi.
ANT-1211: Highlands of Southeast Asia and South-West China (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to critical anthropology of Highlands companies southeast Asia and south-western China which include a dozen countries where more than 100 million people with genetic heritages, historical, linguistic, cultural , religious and political extreme diversity, which makes it a fascinating subject for discipline.

ANT-1400: Transitions post-socialist Asia (3 credits)

Description

The course first considers that were socialist regimes of Asia at their peak (China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Mongolia, some former USSR republics): ideology, history, social organization and political system approached from an anthropological angle, considering such individuals-state relations or memory and forgetting collective violence. The course then analyzes the new challenges that these countries face since their transition to a market economy policies, new social inequalities transformations, development of a consumer culture, religious revival, development and tourism, environmental challenges.

ANT-1500: Inuit Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to Anthropology Inuit before and after contact with Qallunaat (whites). Geographic overview, economic structures, social, political and ideological. Particular importance to the Inuit of Nunavik, Nunavut and the rest of the Canadian Arctic. The course aims to stimulate reflection about the relationship between Quebec and Canada and the aboriginal society.

ANT-1501: Native American Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Critical Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology of the Amerindian populations, with particular emphasis on the Northeast region. The course includes a description of traditional structures on the economic, social, political and ideological. This description is accompanied by an analysis of the impact that the contact with Europeans and Euro-Canadians on these structures and a presentation of Native American efforts to overcome the negative effects of these contacts.

ANT-1600: The Caribbean: religion, health and artistic expressions (3 credits)

Description

This course is an introduction to the Caribbean. It deals with slavery and its colonial past and its influence on the current religious practices and magico-therapeutic (Haitian voodoo, Obeah St Lucia, Cuban Santeria). It then discusses the multiple component waves of migration of its population. The arts and literature are used to illustrate these elements.

ANT-1701: Introduction to aboriginal peoples of Canada (3 credits)

Description

This course is a general introduction to Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit, Indians and Métis. It offers a general picture of the historical, sociological, economic and cultural rights while giving an important place to speak of indigenous themselves to deconstruct related stereotypes.

ANT-1770: Summer School on Aboriginal Peoples (3 credits)

Description

This intensive training is designed to bring together various participants, students and professionals, to address key issues of indigenous peoples. Each edition of this summer school is built around a theme chosen for its relevance and its importance for the future of indigenous communities. The focus is on Aboriginal Nations of Quebec and Canada, but the current comparative approach also leads participants to discuss other Aboriginal peoples of Canada (Métis, Inuit) and elsewhere in the world. Throughout the course, the focus is on exchange with the speakers and among participants.

ANT-2200: Thailand and Vietnam in mirror (3 credits)

Description

Neighbors in Southeast Asia mainland, Thailand and Vietnam are very dissimilar culturally. They belong to two distinct language families; different religions and philosophies have taken root there; and the barrier of the Annamite chain promoted heterogeneous historical course. To see clearly, this course offers a dynamic comparison of these two countries. It provides a general introduction, from an anthropological point of view, these two representatives of the Indian and Chinese heritages in “Indo-China.”

RULE 2-27 AMONG CREDITS

Specialized research

During prioritize

ANT-1305: Anthropology, food and nutrition (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to provide an introduction to the study of food, nutrition and food anthropology. Various topics are covered, which explore the links between food and identity, symbolic systems and rituals, memory, the relation to the body, the environment, including through the production, consumption and management.

ANT-2301: peasantry and globalizations (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the features of the peasantry at large and certain national or transnational peasant and the transformations they have experienced in the context of technological change, urbanization, modernization, globalization and international migration. Considering the concept of peasantry as an object constructed by the social sciences but also as an identity that social actors can reclaim, the course also deals with dynamic and agrarian, food and social struggles of the peasantry during the twentieth century at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

ANT-2304: Anthropology and Development (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological approaches to development and its multiple dimensions examined in terms of globalization, modernity, and links between the “local” and “global”. Specificity of the anthropological approach, both in terms of issues than on methods. Thematic debates.

ANT-2306: Urban Anthropology: the village to the global city (3 credits)
Description

This course introduces to the city as a place to work, live, production, construction and social and cultural transformation, and the relationship between town and country, through an approach that primarily uses the history and ethnography. Different theoretical and methodological perspectives that marked the urban anthropological research are discussed. Among the topics presented include urbanization in countries of the North and South, rural-urban migration, divides sociospatiaux, urban agriculture and urban social movements.

ANT-2308: Maritime Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Emergence and consolidation of the maritime anthropology in social anthropology. Social, economic, political and technical in fishing and coastal activities. Links between artisanal, industrial fishing and aquaculture. Place new dimensions in the coastal dynamics. Issues and challenges in the management and development of coastal resources and the role of international agencies.

ANT-2314: consumption of Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course is an overview of the different approaches, thematic and empirical research is now coasting around the questions and issues that affect consumption. The study of the evolution of consumer culture and consumption practices provoked by capitalism in different regions of the world, is considered a preferred gateway to the contemporary world. It examines the transformation of practices and local and global discourse on consumption of goods through different space-time and especially in the context of globalization. The structural conditions of their arrival, their symbolic dimension, identity, statutory and social production (as defined in Setha Low) of the consumer, the moral economy and civic and political dimension of consumption are all topics being quarter.

ANT-2324: Anthropology of Science and Technology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the field of study of science and technology. Analysis of the impact of science and technology in modern society and the reciprocal influence of science on contemporary societies: a study of their co-production. Situation of science and technology studies at the intersection of multiple disciplines and highlighting the contributions of anthropologists and the implications of the search box on anthropological methods and theories.

Other courses
ANT-1005: Anthropology families and relatives of current (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the new family forms from an anthropological perspective. After affiliation of international adoption or assisted reproduction, created alliances through marriages arranged remotely proliferation of blended families, single parents or same-sex, all these apparently new forms of “doing family” went under the microscope of knowledge Ethnographic to examine the continuity and rupture elements that underlie them.

ANT-1100: Language Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the diversity of languages and their analysis. Relations between anthropological theory and linguistic theory. Introduction to research on the role of language in culture and society (sociolinguistics, ethno-linguistic, ethnosémantique).

ANT-1101: Evolution, genetics and human identity (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to theories of evolution and human genetics and overview of their social impacts. Analysis of the influence of scientific theories and pseudo-scientific theories of evolution on conceptions of identity of human beings. The impacts of theories Improvement, degeneration, similarity and difference are discussed with a look that is both historic and contemporary. The course focuses on emerging theories called biosocial anthropology.
ANT-1102: Religious Anthropology (3 credits)
Description
Studying the history of relations between the concepts of culture, religion and ideology in anthropology; become familiar with the various concepts of anthropology of religions (myths, rituals, cosmology, polytheism, shamanism, etc.); question of religious diversity; reflect on the ideological and religious dimensions of contemporary societies.
ANT-1103: Anthropology of gender (3 credits)
Description
This course aims to convey basic knowledge about feminism as a social movement, as well as feminism and “gender” as approaches conceptual and methodological. It leads to better understand the major impact of feminist approaches and gender anthropology, and the contribution of anthropology to the understanding of gender relations.

ANT-1302: Ethnomedicine ethnopsychiatry and (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course covers the diversity of approaches developed in ethnomedicine, which falls discipline of anthropology. One of the major goals of ethno-medicine is to better understand the nature and the conditions of possibility of systems of meaning, knowledge and action about the disease and the ordering of the world. The course thus illustrates the polysemy (multiple meanings), the multidimensionality (multiple determinants) and polyphony (multiple voices) constituent explanatory models and practices put forward in different societies. We examine the scope and limits of the fundamental conceptual tools ethnomedicine by subjecting them to the empirical through three case studies disease and representation systems in Morocco; culture, sexual health and masculinity in India; culture and mental health of asylum seekers in Canada.

ANT-1304: Sexualities and Cultures (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to better understand how sex and gender are social and cultural constructions. To achieve this, it illustrates the cultural and historical diversity of sexual practices and discourses on sexuality and gender. In doing so, the course raises a critical distance from the as sexuality conceived in the West and explores the close ties between practices, sexual discourse and political and economic issues.

ANT-1306: Anthropology of aging (3 credits)

Description

This course explores and analyzes how different types of aging are built and governed in our societies. It aims to problematize the relationship between public policy, scientific research and social groups in the production categories and their attributes, as well as some of the unintended effects of this production.

ANT-1307: Ethnography dynamic interaction (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on the analysis of the dynamic interaction between humans worldwide. The language and social communication parameters are studied. How ethnographer reports, while being dependent, of these mechanisms is the heart of the proposed reflection. Methodological tools are suggested to address the unspoken provided the statement, speaking out as far as the delegation of representation to a spokesman, and so on. Specific cases to understanding the role of common phenomena in social life as gossip, insults, greetings, etc.

ANT-1401: Popular Culture and Globalization (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to familiarize students with the major theories of cultural globalization processes and analysis of contemporary popular culture (including Cultural Studies, Frankfurt School). Using varied cultural backgrounds ethnographic illustrations on music, film and television mainly, students are encouraged to reflect on the Conservative or emancipatory role of these means of expression, their mobilization to for identity claim and the persistence of borders (actual, imagined) cultural globalization within its borders.

ANT-1490: Inuit Language and Culture (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to certain practices and representations characterizing the Inuit past and present through the study of their language and cultural expression. This course is not a course of conversation or Inuit grammar, but an overview of some semantic categories particularly important, as well as their translation into Inuit language.

ANT-1500: Inuit Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to Anthropology Inuit before and after contact with Qallunaat (whites). Geographic overview, economic structures, social, political and ideological. Particular importance to the Inuit of Nunavik, Nunavut and the rest of the Canadian Arctic. The course aims to stimulate reflection about the relationship between Quebec and Canada and the aboriginal society.

ANT-1501: Native American Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Critical Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology of the Amerindian populations, with particular emphasis on the Northeast region. The course includes a description of traditional structures on the economic, social, political and ideological. This description is accompanied by an analysis of the impact that the contact with Europeans and Euro-Canadians on these structures and a presentation of Native American efforts to overcome the negative effects of these contacts.

ANT-1502: Indigenous Movements: recognition and international dynamics (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of indigenous movements and their socio-historical contexts of emergence, especially internationally. Analysis of the recognition of the “indigenous” category on the world stage and institutionalization of indigenous rights, including through the work of the UN. Scan of the use of indigenous rights in various parts of the world as well as some common concerns for indigenous peoples as they are based locally.

ANT-1601: socio-political and human issues of migration (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of indigenous movements and their socio-historical contexts of emergence, especially internationally. Analysis of the recognition of the “indigenous” category on the world stage and institutionalization of indigenous rights, including through the work of the UN. Scan of the use of indigenous rights in various parts of the world as well as some common concerns for indigenous peoples as they are based locally.

ANT-1602: Body, suffering and pain (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to stimulate reflection in students on its body design and its relationship to suffering and pain. The human body is always “worked” by own practices at a time and a place.

ANT-1701: Introduction to aboriginal peoples of Canada (3 credits)

Description

This course is a general introduction to Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit, Indians and Métis. It offers a general picture of the historical, sociological, economic and cultural rights while giving an important place to speak of indigenous themselves to deconstruct related stereotypes.

ANT-1751: Anthropological Perspectives on Islam (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological reading of Islam as a religion, such as discursive tradition and system of meaning, knowledge and actions. It deals, among others: the historical and theological complexities of Islam; Islam as dealt with by anthropologists; theological, cultural dimensions and realities of various policies such as immigration postseptembre 2011; Muslim woman as subject or object as a cultural and political face veil, polygamy and contraception; the links between mental health and symbolic thought; the contemplative Sufi and Sufism action.

ANT-1770: Summer School on Aboriginal Peoples (3 credits)

Description

This intensive training is designed to bring together various participants, students and professionals, to address key issues of indigenous peoples. Each edition of this summer school is built around a theme chosen for its relevance and its importance for the future of indigenous communities. The focus is on Aboriginal Nations of Quebec and Canada, but the current comparative approach also leads participants to discuss other Aboriginal peoples of Canada (Métis, Inuit) and elsewhere in the world. Throughout the course, the focus is on exchange with the speakers and among participants.

ANT-2100: Political Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course examines the contributions of anthropology to our understanding of policy forms in societies. It takes as its starting point a number of classic studies of the process of organizing power and sense of reports in several non-Western societies, studies that have contributed to the articulation of anthropological perspectives on the policy. These studies and perspectives are drawn upon to illuminate the nature of power relations in the world today. The pedagogical approach of the course is varied and focused on achieving individual research on a topic related to the course.

ANT-2101: From potlatch on the stock exchange: anthropological decoding of the economy (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the reproduction of the companies in view of their utilitarian and symbolic relationship with the physical world. It explores critically classic subjects like the potlatch and the gift, universalist theories like Marxism and neo-liberalism, as well as current issues such as relocation, stock exchange and fair trade.

ANT-2300: Health Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to introduce students to the analysis of health and disease phenomena in a global and systemic perspective where, society, culture and environment interact. It also aims learning of the main theoretical concepts and models through a series of concrete examples from Haitian and international research. It covers topics such as the influence of culture on biomedical and popular diagnostic categories, popular knowledge related to the causes and treatments of disease, public health and international health issues of immigrant populations.

ANT-2302: Minorities and Ethnicity (3 credits)

Description

The course travels the world to find the logic of sustainability of contemporary ethnic minorities. It explores the anthropological reflection on the concepts of minority, ethnicity, identity, transnational, multicultural societies and diasporas. It questions the origins of these concepts and state the structural elements as much deconstructing the discourse of the minority than the majority. The student is able to case studies of contemporary ethnic minorities (indigenous peoples, national minorities, migrants, refugees) and the challenges they face.

ANT-2303: Anthropology and Environment (3 credits)

Description

Emergence and consolidation of the anthropology of the environment through its various conceptual currents. Analysis joints between environmental issues and companies. Study different dimensions of environmental dynamics (social, cultural, economic, political, symbolic, gender) using ethnographic examples. Analysis of aspects and implications of management and environmental conservation.

ANT-2307: Contemporary Aboriginal Issues (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to analyze the main contemporary topical issues relating to indigenous peoples. The focus is on Aboriginal claims and political struggles, the assertion places and appropriation, as well as social and political issues of the communities. Then, this course takes as its starting point the status of Native Americans to treat the condition and aspirations of indigenous peoples of the world, both from a comparative point of view and from the perspective of the claims and joint mobilizations On the international scene.

ANT-2309: Visual Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

Overview of the history of visual anthropology and its relationship with the development of cinema. Nanook to Atanarjuat: visualization and critical of several classic ethnographic films. Examination of different preferred approaches to documentary ethnocinéma: illustrate, describe, provoke, experiment and represent. Reflection on the image and reality, the relationship to the images and on the factory look. From the artwork to the digital image, photography to reality TV, the image conflicts with the knowledge and power. Review of some contemporary debates around this particular form of Anthropology writing. Presentations and filmic sequences presentation by students.

ANT-2310: Anthropology of conflicts and violence (3 credits)

Description

Introduce students to the field of conflict studies, violence and conflict resolution from an anthropological perspective. Present the main concepts, theories and methodological and analytical tools. Analyze the forms, nature and causes of conflicts (inter-community and international) based on case studies in different regions of the world.

ANT-2311: Anthropology of Socialists and post-socialist societies (3 credits)

Description

The course focuses on the specific relationships between social actors and the state in socialist countries as well as the continuation of such relations in the post-socialist countries. He studies the historical transformations that have marked these societies, States and the nature of governance and social organization and social movements. The course covers these topics by applying them to different countries including Eastern Europe, Cuba, China and Vietnam, bringing special attention to the problems and characteristics peculiar to them.

ANT-2312: Native Cosmologies (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of Amerindian and Inuit cosmologies. Study of these religious systems in their traditional and contemporary forms. The course presents both the unity and diversity of these traditions, but especially their resilience and adaptation following the irruption of Christianity and modernity.

ANT-2315: Anthropology, arts and aesthetics (3 credits)

Description

This course begins with an overview of the main approaches of the anthropology of art, focusing for example the status of primitive art, the symbolic visual language, the power of objects or the expressive power music, dance and performance. It continues with a deepening of anthropology of aesthetics, addressing the role of the beautiful and appearances in social life, the constitution of the experience of self and the world through the sensory, or labor mobilization Aesthetics in ritual efficacy.

ANT-2316: Anthropology of morals and ethno Ethics (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on various issues. What are the conceptions of morality in different cultures? What are its borders, its interfaces with religious or political? What values and social norms into play? And especially how, in everyday life, are built moral reasoning? By what process, and on what basis, do we judge the moral acceptability of such behavior towards his children, relatives, religious or civil authorities? What meaning can we give to morality “secular” or “popular”? The concept of “common morality” proposed by some ethicists did sense?

ANT-2317: Anthropology of forced exile and refugees (3 credits)

Description

The course suggests a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of forced exile. It looks at the contributions of anthropology, law and transcultural psychiatry to a better understanding of the causes and consequences of forced migration. These causes and these consequences are examined through case studies, both in terms of sending and receiving societies (political, institutions, governmental and non-governmental organizations) to individuals (suffering)

ANT-2319: reconstruction : Social Imaginary (3 credits)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of imagination and such speech they are used in social anthropology. Anthropological Perspectives on various figures of the social imagination as utopia, the ethnofiction, prophecy or fear as elements of political languages. Comparative and critical examination of the relationship between power and discursive productions, performances and between.

ANT-2320: institutions: Mobility and language practice (3 credits)

Description

Language practices change from childhood to adulthood at the option of cognitive development and the circumstances of everyday life. Most people also face various forms of spatial mobility and symbolic practices that influence their language throughout their lives. So is it on Migration, relocation for professional purposes, etc. So language socialization is an ongoing process that explains the momentary abandonment of languages by individuals, but also their persistence over time and beyond the borders of the collective point of view.

ANT-2321: anthropological approach of the colonial situation (3 credits)

Description

This course is part of a renewed interest in Europe and North America, to the colonial question among anthropologists as among historians. From a critical perspective and a renewed dialogue between history and anthropology, this is to compare the approaches to colonialism and to identify the conceptual and methodological tools useful for its analysis. Special situations are examined to better understand the colonization and structural realities.

ANT-2322: Anthropology in Haiti 3 credits)

Description

This course is addressed in a historical perspective. The critical study of ethnographic texts and their production context, he recounts how Haiti was once the “other” perfect object of ethnographic studies, particularly on the part of American researchers. It also analyzes the development of the Haitian anthropology and what characterizes it in relation to these pioneering work and other influences, at the confluence of Anglo-American and French traditions.

ANT-2323: Cultural Hegemony and resistors (3 credits)

Description

In the field of anthropology of power, this course reveals first, then tries to interpret the forms of cultural hegemony – in the sense of Antonio Gramsci – as well as forms of resistance to this hegemony in the world . These resistances are expressed in all forms: social movements, environmentalists and pacifists projects, fair trade, union, legal claims, infra, resistance “everyday” denounced by public display, use of microcredit, social-election plans Democrats, boycotts and strikes.

ANT-2500: Indigenous Thematic I (3 credits)

Description

This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of a seminar and a forum for exchange and reflection where researchers, indigenous studies specialists come to present various facets of their research on topics such as political claims, territorial and identity, health, the economy and development, religious and ritual dynamics in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies.

ANT-2501: Indigenous Thematic II (3 credits)

Description
This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of formal presentations or seminars during which researchers and possibly of Native Studies specialists present various aspects of their research or their interventions on issues such as political claims, territorial and identity , health, economy and development, or the religious and ritual dynamics, or located in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies. [/su_note]

AS-2502: Indigenous Thematic III (3 credits)

Description

This course addresses major issues affecting indigenous societies in the contemporary context. It takes the form of formal presentations or seminars during which researchers and possibly of Native Studies specialists present various aspects of their research or their interventions on issues such as political claims, territorial and identity , health, economy and development, or the religious and ritual dynamics, or located in a comparative perspective. By developing a sustained reflection on a theme throughout the session, the student is able to deepen his knowledge of the field of indigenous studies.

ANT-2600: anthropological themes I (3 credits)

Description

This course allows a professor of the Department of Anthropology or a guest professor to present a theme of his choice and to deepen it for an entire session.

ANT-2601: Anthropological Topics II (3 credits)

Description

This course allows a professor of the Department of Anthropology or a guest professor to present a theme of his choice and to deepen it for an entire session.

ETN-1004: Introduction to Material Culture (3 credits)

Description

This course is a review of techniques used to meet the material needs necessary for human survival by showing customs, practices and behaviors traditionally associated with these processes. Evidence in the form of gestures, objects, customs and stories, are considered in relation to physical and human environment: it will report the time of contexts and places, ethnic contributions, similarities and differences in the various Francophone communities in North America.

ETN-3001: Tourism and Heritage (3 credits)

Description

Tourism is growing as an operator change in economic, social and cultural. It plays a key role in the promotion and recognition of local cultures and the highlighting of cultural diversity across the world. Cultural tourism, including heritage, occupies a central place in urban and tourism policies of host countries. By putting heritage at the forefront of tourism, they take advantage of their openness to international tourism to present themselves as authentic and distinctive destinations, with a power of attraction that combines the particular with the universal .

SOC-1001: Data Analysis I (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to quantitative data analysis techniques: paintings contingencies bivariate and multivariate, regression analysis, using SPSS with instructions. This course is a prerequisite in Analysis II data.
Individualized courses

ANT-2740: Directed Readings I (3 credits)

Description

This course enables students to deepen their knowledge on a topic that particularly interested to pursue a literature search, to familiarize themselves with a new theme or gradually become part of a research team by readings in the supervision of a teacher. Before enrolling, the student must have obtained the agreement of the teacher who will oversee it.

ANT-3400: Directed Readings II (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to enable students to deepen their knowledge on a topic that particularly interested to pursue a literature search, to familiarize themselves with a new theme or gradually become part of a team. Search by readings taken under the supervision of a teacher. Before enrolling, the student must have obtained the agreement of a teacher for supervision.
SPRING YEAR 1 (16 credits)

Description

This course is designed to support a team in interdisciplinary reflection on a previously set theme of rural development in the Third World. Several topics are presented and discussed. Students choose one on which they will then prepare a coordinated manner records. They must finally, genuine seminar, discussing the facts and possibilities of.

BIO-4900: Change: Ecology and Environment (3 credits)

Description

Relationships between organisms, their habitats and human activity in a context of sustainable development and global change; foundations and function of marine and terrestrial ecosystems, ecosystem services, biotic integrity and stability concept; biogeography and biological invasions; environmental crisis; ecotoxicology; management of living resources.

BIO-4901: Evolution and biodiversity (3 credits)
Description

This course is an invitation to discover the evolutionary biology. The course starts with a thorough study of the modern classification of the living world with several examples that highlight the economic value of biodiversity. Many links are made between biodiversity and sustainable development concepts. The teaching method uses a modern phylogenetic approach biochemical and anatomical similarities between living organisms. The last part of the course presents the theory of evolution Darwin (the modern evolutionary synthesis) and the mechanisms of natural selection and sexual selection. It covers several concepts of Paleobiology and biogeography.

FOR-2010: Environmental Assessment (2 credits)

Description

Understanding the concept of environmental information. Use of environmental information in the context of an impact study. Theory and methods of the impact study. Design and implementation of components of an impact study. Understanding the institutional framework within which fits this kind of study. Analysis of studies conducted in the framework of specific projects.

FOR-2015: Problems logging in Haiti (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to policy analysis and decision making in public administration. Description and study of the Quebec forest. Development of forestry problems in Haiti according to axes economic, social, cultural and environmental. Inserting the Haitian forestry in a global perspective. Exploration of the multidimensional nature of the forest. Understanding of the ethical foundations of forest practice in Haiti.

FOR-2205: Special Topics (1 credit)

Description

This course allows the student to carry out a training activity for which no price is offered during his university career. The student performs individual work and tailor which can take several forms: literature review an untreated subject of interest in the program, compilation and interpretation of data on a research topic, learning tips techniques, etc. . The chosen theme and activities must contribute to complement the student’s training. It must also prepare a synthesis report of these activities.

GGR-1008: Natural Environments (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces students to the basic data for understanding the distribution and the main characteristics of terrestrial biomes (hot, temperate and cold regions) and aquatic (marine and lacustrine) of the planet. Ocean-atmosphere interactions-continents are also important topics covered in this course as well as disturbance of natural environments illustrated by specific cases (eg the introduction of species, forest fires, volcanic activity, cases of environmental toxicity).

GGR-3101: Environmental Historical Geography (3 credits)

Description

Human geography and physics is anthropocentric because it focuses on how humans perceive their environment. This course aims to highlight the historical geography as perception, understanding and human impact on the environment since the Age of Enlightenment to the post-industrial period.

GLG-1900: Introduction to Earth Sciences (3 credits)

Description

Theoretical course. Internal dynamics of the Earth: continental drift, internal structure of the Earth, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rock deformation, mountain ranges. The external dynamics of the Earth: continents, oceans, atmosphere-ocean interactions. The materials of the earth’s crust: minerals, rocks. The resources of the planet: groundwater, fossil fuels, ore deposits. Haiti’s geology. Practical work in continuity with the theoretical course. Field visits, laboratory observation of minerals, rocks and fossils, geological map reading.

LP-3610: Internship in the Haitian public service (3 credits)

Description

Paid training to acquire practical work experience in the Haitian public service, in an area closely related to bachelor’s degrees in the Faculty of Social Sciences. This course, lasting about 225 hours, must be approved by the program director at registration. The assessment is made by the internship supervisor and environment on the basis of a placement report.

PHI-1116: Philosophy of Nature (3 credits)

Description

Study of some conceptions of nature (especially those of Aristotle, Descartes and Whitehead) for passing the student to a more or less commonplace vision, naive or romantic nature, to design an informed, thoughtful depth and different realities directly or indirectly related to the idea of nature. Highlighting a few fundamental problems and some essential evidence. The question of interiority and purpose in nature; the phenomenon of consciousness; the time and motion; the opposition nature-culture; nature and ecology.

PHI-1901: Current Issues in Applied Ethics (3 credits)

Description

Ethical concerns are now ubiquitous in debates in contemporary societies. These concerns are also at the heart of a multidisciplinary scope of reflection and intervention called “applied ethics”. In this course, we focus on applied current ethical issues to better understand some of the major themes of applied ethics, theoretical models that are developed there and the methods it uses to address the problems faced our societies.

POL-2207: Environmental Policies (3 credits)

Description

The course objective is to introduce students to environmental issues from the perspective of policy analysis and public administration. The evolution of ecological thinking. The appearance of the main environmental issues and problems in contemporary societies. The instruments and management mechanisms at national and international level. The role of social forces. Haitian dimension of environmental policies. Foreign experiences.

POL-2505: Introduction to environmentalist thought (3 credits)

Description

Review of major philosophical and political themes found in the Ecologist thought. History of ecology as a science and its relationship to environmentalism as a political movement. Origins of environmental awareness. Examination of different environmental approaches and their critics. Study of the main challenges of the XXI century.

SOC-2114: Environment and Society (3 credits)

Description

Study of the relationship between nature and societies. Representations of nature. Genesis of the ecological thought. Environmental issues: water, forests, air, ocean energy. Science and politics of global environmental problems: climate change, biodiversity. The environmental movement: origin, diversification, actions and impacts. Environmental policies and sustainable development.

SOC-2120: Sociology of technological innovation (3 credits)

Description

Context, processes and impacts of technology innovation. Science and technology. Explain innovation. States and companies in research and development. Science and technology policies. Socio-technical controversies: large dams; biosciences and biotechnology; new information technologies; nanotechnology. Managing technological risks. High reliability organizations. Social technology assessment.

PROFILES OF STUDY

EHE-1ANT: international profile: Studies – International profile – Bachelor’s degree in anthropology (12 to 18 credits)

Description

Activities carried out in a university abroad, under international profile, which will be equivalencies student record upon presentation of the official transcript of the activities.
Course Information
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Instructors