Department of Physics

BACHELOR (LICENSE) PHYSICS (B. SC.)

Goal

This program provides a fundamental knowledge of the physical universe in its different scales. On the menu, a theoretical and experimental training in important areas of physics with mathematics and efficient IT tools. The courses address a significant number of current issues, including analytical mechanics, relativity, electromagnetism and waves, thermodynamics and statistical physics, quantum physics, lasers and fiber optics, semi and superconductors , astrophysics, subatomic physics and medical imaging. You will be able to use the devices and to apply scientific methods used to observe and measure physical phenomena and interpret the results while linking them to the laws, rules and relevant models.

Ability

A passion for science and nature. Desire to understand the laws governing the world around us. Loving calculate well as analyze and solve problems. Loving research. Have capacity for abstraction and reasoning. Owning a methodical mind and be thorough. Have a good concentration. Be persistent.

Opportunity

Today physics studies a wide range of problems among the most abstract and complex. Physical seeking answers everywhere: both in the infinitely small world of elementary particles than in the infinitely large, the arrangement of galaxies. Nothing escapes this area whose applications are numerous. Whether we think of the new lasers, for example, used both in basic research in biomedical imaging.

A teaching career in high school is also possible: the specialized graduate degree (DESS) in education as well as the Masters in Physical offer additional preparation prized by several universities. In addition, under certain conditions, you can legally qualify for secondary education by obtaining 61 credits mainly related to internships and teaching in the Bachelor of Secondary Education – Science and Technology.

Professions

In Theoretical and Experimental Physics Researcher

Teacher

Science journalist and adviser

Employers

Academic institutions, college and high school

Research laboratories

Tech companies

Media

OPEN TO ADVANCED PROGRAMS

This leads to bachelor graduate studies in physics, particularly in the following subject areas: astrophysics, optics, photonics and laser, atomic and molecular physics, medical physics, nuclear physics, theoretical science and space physics.

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION

All requirements must be met when undertaking the program.

The applicant must meet the following conditions:

Be 18 years or older.

Hold a high school diploma (Bac II) or its equivalent.

Having left school early.

Applicants presenting a combination of education and relevant experience deemed equivalent to that required of the holder applicant may be eligible as a result of the analysis of the file. The program is limited enrollment, the number of places is very limited.

Selection criteria

The application is analyzed on the basis of the quality of academic record.

Laptop

In undertaking its program, the student must acquire, from the first session, a portable computer equipped with a number of software, allowing the applicant to undertake the course of his research. Proficiency in basic computer functions and common software is essential. Introductory courses to specialized software are offered outside the program.

Knowledge of French

The student admitted to the physics department must comply with the provisions relating to the application of the Policy on the use of French at the University GOC

Non-francophone candidate

The candidate whose language of instruction in primary and secondary education is not the French must demonstrate a minimum level of knowledge of the French language. His skills in written French will be assessed on arrival and, where applicable, a patch French courses could be added to its journey.

 

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

GRADE

Bachelor (Licence) in Physics (B. SC.)

*This page presents the official version of the program. The University G.O.C. reserves the right to change the content without notice.

PHY – Physics

PHY0150 Physics: Classical Mechanics

PHY0250 Physics: Electricity and Magnetism

PHY0260 Physics Waves and particles

PHY1000 Introduction to astrophysics

I PHY1001 Mathematical Physics

PHY1002 Mathematical Physics II

PHY1003 Mechanics and Relativity

PHY1004 Mathematical Physics III

PHY1005 Waves and linear systems

PHY1006 Quantum Physics

PHY1007 Electromagnetics

PHY1008 Experimental Physics I

PHY1100 laboratory work

PHY1590 Internship Physics I

PHY1902 Astronomy: a guided tour of the Universe

PHY1903 General Physics

PHY1904 Physics Measurements

PHY1905 Astronomy General

PHY1906 Life, the Universe and the rest: introduction to astrobiology

PHY1910 Wood Physics

PHY2000 Analytical Mechanics

PHY2001 Electromagnetic waves

PHY2002 Experimental Physics II

PHY2003 Physics heat

PHY2004 Optics

PHY2005 Quantum Mechanics I

PHY2006 Experimental Physics III

PHY2007 atomic and nuclear physics

PHY2100 Space sciences

PHY2200 Astrophysics

PHY2500 Physics ideas Evolution

PHY2501 Mathematical Methods in Physics

PHY2502 Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complexity

PHY2590 Physics Course II

PHY2900 Laboratory Science and Technology

PHY2901 Physics in our environment

PHY3000 Statistical Physics

PHY3001 Quantum Mechanics II

PHY3002 Experimental Physics IV

PHY3003 Solid State Physics

PHY3004 Experimental Physics V

PHY3200 Plasma Physics

PHY3201 Atomic and Molecular Physics

PHY3202 Project I

PHY3400 Physics and Nuclear Medical

PHY3500 Computational Physics

PHY3501 Particle Physics

PHY3590 Physics Course III

PHY4000 Medical Imaging

PHY4015 Quantum Mechanics II

TRACKING PROGRAM (90 credits)

PHYSICS (63 CREDITS)

PHY-1000: Introduction to astrophysics (3 credits)

Description

The course, which is open to physics students and students with basic scientific knowledge (college level science program of nature), is a review of basic concepts and recent discoveries of modern astrophysics. Topics include: planetary motion, solar and lunar phenomena, telescopes, classification and evolution of stars, compact objects (white dwarfs, pulsars and black holes), the Milky Way and other galaxies, quasars and Cosmology.

 PHY-1001: Mathematical Physics I (3 credits)

Description

Linear algebra: vectors, matrices, determinants, special matrices (Hermitian, unitary, normal), matrix functions, own values and eigenvectors, diagonalization, diagonalization of applications, factoring singular value. Vector Spaces: base, standard scalar product, orthonormal basis, Gram-Schmidt algorithm. Vector calculus: gradient, divergence, curl, curvilinear coordinates; parametric curves and surfaces; integrals on curves, surfaces and volumes; theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Probability and statistics: random variables, distributions, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, correlation, law of large numbers, central limit theorem.

PHY-1002: Mathematical Physics II (3 credits)

Description

Complex numbers. Fourier series. Fourier transforms and Laplace. Ordinary differential equations of the first order. Ordinary differential equations of higher order.

PHY-1003: Mechanics and Relativity (3 credits)

Description

Non Galilean reference systems. Special relativity. Kinematic: postulates, Lorentz transformations, concept of four-vector Minkowski diagram, velocity addition. Dynamic: covariance, quadrivector energy-momentum, collisions. Benchmarks accelerated linearly or in rotation. Introduction to rigid body dynamics.

PHY-1004: Mathematical Physics III (3 credits)

Description

Solutions of differential equations by the power series method and the method of eigenfunctions. Special functions: Legendre polynomials, spherical harmonics, Bessel function, Chebyshev polynomials, Laguerre and Hermite, hypergeometric function and gamma function. Orthogonal functions. Sturm-Liouville equations. Differential partial differential equations: introduction and background, wave equation, diffusion equation and Laplace equation, method of separation of variables and integral transformation method. Inhomogeneous equations and Green functions.

PHY-1005: Waves and Linear Systems (3 credits)

Description

Free oscillations of systems having one or more degrees of freedom. Methods. Continuous systems. Forced oscillations. Resonance. Coupled oscillators. Wave. Phase velocity. Dispersion. Reflection. Modulation, pulse, wave packets. Group velocity. Waves in two and three dimensions.

PHY-1006: Quantum Physics (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to develop the student a solid understanding of the fundamental concepts of quantum physics. Thermal radiation and Planck’s postulate. The photon and corpuscular aspect of radiation. The postulate of de Broglie wave aspect and the particle. The Heisenberg indeterminacy relations. The Bohr atomic model. Quantum mechanics and the Schrödinger equation. Applications of the Schrödinger equation in some simple potentials: free particle, walking, barrier and potential well. The hydrogen.

PHY-1007: Electromagnetism (3 credits)

Description

Electrostatic field: Coulomb’s law, Gauss’ law, electric potential. Electrostatic problems of solutions of Laplace equations and Poisson. Stationary electric currents. Electrostatic phenomena in the dielectric. Magnetic field: vector potential, Biot-Savart law, magnetic energy. Non-stationary field: Faraday’s law, Maxwell’s equations.

PHY-2000: Analytical Mechanics (3 credits)

Description

Hamilton’s principle and equations in Euler-Lagrange generalized coordinates. Some applications with different types of potential. Oscillations about an equilibrium point. The canonical formalism of Hamilton equations, canonical transformations and Poisson brackets. Canonical perturbation theory. The Lagrangian and the rigid body.

PHY-2001 Electromagnetic waves (3 credits)

Description

Review of Maxwell’s equations boundary conditions. Solution of Maxwell’s equations in vacuum, in a dielectric medium in an ionized gas in a conductive medium. Plane-wave planar interfaces: normal incidence, oblique incidence. Optical applications: antireflection layer, Brewster angle polarizer. Notions on transmission lines. Metal waveguides: bi-planar, rectangular and circular. Planar dielectric waveguides. Solutions of Maxwell’s equations with a source term: radiation. Dipole antenna.

PHY-2002: Experimental Physics II (3 credits)

Description

Basic concepts in electronics and electromagnetism covering both fundamental aspects, and experimental techniques. Resolution circuits by Laplace transform and Kirchhoff’s laws. DC currents, periodic signals, filters and oscillators. Production of circuits, metrology and instrumentation including computer control.

PHY-2003: Heat Physics (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to classical thermodynamics. The emphasis is on the functions and variables such as energy, entropy, heat and work, not to mention the pressure, volume and temperature. Consequences of the two laws of thermodynamics, particularly during transformations and cycles that model thermal machines. Introduction to potential and their meanings, as well as real gases and phase changes. Simplified approach to the microscopic origin of macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics, the Maxwell distribution, the Boltzmann factor, imbalance and transfers.

PHY-2007: Atomic and nuclear physics (3 credits)

Description

Important phenomena in atomic physics and quantum numbers. Electron configuration. Coupling L and S j j. Fine and hyperfine structure of atoms. Atomic transitions: rules, observation and use. Main core properties: mass, charge, bond energy, dimensions, nuclear force. Structure and nuclear models. Methods disintegration and radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fusion and fission. Nuclear applications in the industrial and medical fields. Doses and radiation.

PHY-2004: Optical (3 credits)

Description

Interference and interferometers. Diffraction: Fraunhofer, Fresnel networks. Polarization: Representation, Jones matrices. Anisotropic media. Dispersive media and optical constants. Geometric optics: optical systems, image formation and aberrations. Applications.

PHY-2005: Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

Description

Space of wave functions. Space of quantum states. Dirac notation. Operations and performance of operators. Mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. Harmonic oscillator. Angular momentum. Central potential: the hydrogen atom.

PHY-2006: Experimental Physics III (3 credits)

Description

Practical work on the most current experimental methods in physics. Faraday effect. Laser. LEDs: photometric, radiometric and spectral properties. Interference spectroscopy. Michelson interferometer. Fibre optics. Guided propagation of centimeter waves. Total reflection evanescent waves and tunneling.

PHY-3000: Statistical Physics (3 credits)

Description

Microscopic description of a physical system. Elements of the probability theory. Random walk. Statistics sets. Statistical physics and thermodynamic relations. Fermi-Dirac statistics. Bose-Einstein statistics. The states of matter and phase transitions of the first and second order.

PHY-3002: Experimental Physics IV (3 credits)

Description

Advanced work practices on the most current experimental methods in physics. Franck-Hertz experiment. Molecular iodine absorption. Capillary waves. X-ray diffraction: Debye-Scherrer method. Pockels effect. CO2 laser: radiation and properties of the active medium. Vacuum techniques. Techniques for producing thin films.

PHY-3003: Solid State Physics (3 credits)

Description

Crystal structure. Crystal Dynamics. Free electrons in metals. Periodicity of the crystal potential: energy bands. Wave-crystal interaction. Neutron scattering and electrons. The fermiologie. Semiconductor crystals. Superconductors. Low dimensionality systems.

PHY-3004: Experimental Physics V (3 credits)

Description

Advanced work practices on the most current experimental methods in physics. Acousto-optics. CO2 laser: spectral analysis. Gas mass spectrometry. X-ray diffraction: Laue method. Color centers. Nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Stern-Gerlach experiment. Half-life of a nuclear level. Compton effect. Activation by slow neutrons. Positron annihilation. Angular correlation gamma – gamma.

RULE 1-3 AMONG CREDITS:

GLO-1901: Introduction to Programming with Python (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the main programming paradigms for solving IT problems. It covers, in particular procedural programming, functional, object-oriented and event. To illustrate these paradigms, it uses the Python language.

IFT-1004: Introduction to Programming (3 credits)

Description

Paradigms and programming languages. Introduction to problem solving with Python. The interpreted language, Python, to a compiled, structured language, the C language specification of a problem and functional decomposition. Modular programming. Notions of black box, interface, precondition and postcondition. Error handling and exceptions management mechanism. Recursion. Introduction to complexity of algorithms. Programming standards.

IFT-1701: Introduction to algorithmic and programming (3 credits)

Description

Algorithmics and programming. Data types. Reading and writing data. Assignment. Conditional and repetitive structures. Introduction to classes and objects. Methods: parameters and references. A string of character and enumerated type. Exception handling. Flows and files. Usual controls and dialogs. Menus. Introduction to the concepts of programming objects. Various applications. Practical work in an appropriate programming language and environment with WYSIWYG graphical tools.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS PROGRAM (27 CREDITS)

The student can take three optional practical training courses: PHY-1590-PHY 2590 and PHY-3590. The credits of these courses are in addition to the credit requirements of the program. To register, contact the program director.

REQUIREMENTS 1-15 CREDITS:

GPH-2102: Fiber optic (4 credits)

Description

Guided Optics: electromagnetic theory of the plan guide (TE-TM); geometric model; coupling two guides plans; introduction to integrated optics. Integrated Optics Laboratory: fabrication and characterization of a plan guide; study of coupling two guides. Optical fiber: propagation of a pulse in a dispersive medium; electromagnetic theory of fiber step-index; Introduction to fiber optic communications; introduction to fiber optic sensors. Laboratory fiber: characterization of a single-mode and multimode fiber; construction of a fiber optic communication system; fabricating an optical fiber sensor.

GPH-3100: Fundamentals of Photonics (3 credits)

Description

Topics covered: electromagnetic waves; light polarization, wave propagation in media; structural and intrinsic anisotropy; electro-optical; magneto-optical; acousto-optical; Introduction to nonlinear optics. Objectives: at the end of the course, students should be able to analyze the interaction between the anisotropic and polarized light, manipulating different polarization components and design electro modulators, magneto-optical and acousto.

GPH-3003: Hands-Biomedical Engineering (3 credits)

Description

This laboratory allows students to further explore the concepts associated with the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. By combining theory view in previous courses in a series of experiments (Compton, photoelectric, Neutron Activation, radiation protection), the participant is better able to reflect critically on some key issues for medical applications (radioisotope production , X-ray beams from a medical linear accelerator). The notions of projection imaging (X-rays) and 3D computed tomography imaging (scanner, PET) are also studied in detail: contrast, resolution, modulation transfer function.

GPH-4100: Lasers and Applications (3 credits)

Description

Model of the classic oscillator and stimulated emission. Electric dipole transitions. Evolution equations. Laser amplification. Optical cavities and feedback. Laser beams and types of resonators. Applications of lasers in materials processing, remote sensing, telecommunications and medicine.

GPH-4101: Introduction to optical design (3 credits)

Description

The course allows students to understand the issues of the use of optical components. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the optical design process and how to use an optical design software. The course emphasizes the geometric optics, optical materials, aberrations, the image quality and design of optical systems.

GPH-4102: Hands-oriented biophotonics (3 credits)

Description

Practical work on relevant experimental techniques in biophotonics. Microscopy: resolution limits, acquisition and processing of digital images. Scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence phenomenon. Raman spectroscopy. Optical tweezers: manipulation and force measurement in the micrometer scale. Photometry and characterization of tissue.

PHY-2100: Space Science (3 credits)

Description

This course is for students enrolled in science and engineering program or geomatics. It is an introduction to space research and the specific problems of space. Space probes and artificial satellites. The space environment and use. Terrestrial and planetary atmospheres atmospheric luminescence. Cosmic energy sources. Astrodynamics elements. Space exploration. Scientific and technical programs. Canadian Space Policy.

PHY-2200: Astrophysics (3 credits)

Description

Physical concepts and basic astrophysics. Random processes in astrophysics. Photons and relativistic particles. Electromagnetic processes in the Universe. Quantum astrophysical processes. Stellar rays. Process of generating energy in the stars. Compact objects. Properties of galaxies. Physics of the interstellar medium. Structure of the Universe and Cosmology. This course is given at the winter session in even years.

PHY-2500: physics ideas Evolution (3 credits)

Description

Summary of main areas of classical physics and foundations of modern physics, reconsidered from the point of view of their historical development. Classical mechanics. The light. Electromagnetism. Heat: thermodynamics in the kinetic theory of gases. Relativity. Quantum mechanics. This course is given every two years in even years, in the winter session.

PHY-2501: Mathematical Methods in Physics (3 credits)

Description

Infinite series: convergence criteria, summation techniques and asymptotic series. Complex analysis: complex functions, Cauchy, Laurent expansion, calculation of residues. Tensor analysis: operations and the tensor, covariant form in physical laws. Introduction to group theory. This course is given in the winter semester in odd years.

PHY-2502: Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complexity (3 credits)

Description

Nonlinear dynamics in 1 and 2 dimensions: historical introduction, autonomous systems of order 1, the bifurcation theory (1D), autonomous systems of order 2 and Hamiltonian systems with one degree of freedom. The deterministic chaos: introduction, autonomous systems of order 3, discrete dynamical systems (1D applications) and measures of chaos. Special topics: numerical analysis, fractal geometry, chaos control and synchronization of dynamic reconstruction, complex analytic dynamics, Hamiltonian dynamics, complexity and chaos.

PHY-3202: Project I (3 credits)

Description

Experimental or theoretical work done under the guidance of a teacher and according to established procedures.

PHY-3500: Computational Physics (3 credits)

Description

This course provides a working knowledge of basic methods own scientific computing. Numerical methods are used for the solution of problems encountered in physics: ordinary differential equations, border issues and values, special functions and quadrature Gaussian, data analysis, matrix operations, elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations, and stochastic methods.

PHY-3501: Particle Physics (3 credits)

Description

Elements of quantum theory. Particle detectors and accelerators. Invariance principle and conservation laws. Hadron-hadron interactions. Quark model. Electromagnetic interactions. Weak interactions. Quark-quark interactions. Unification of forces.

PHY-4000: Medical Imaging (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the various modern medical imaging modalities that are frequently encountered in both the diagnosis (radiology and nuclear medicine) for assistance to cancer treatments. We are interested in the physical principles underlying technological advances and their impact on image quality.

PHY-4015: Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

Description

Historical development of quantum mechanics. Spin and angular momentum. Theory stationary disturbances. Approximation methods for time-dependent problems. Identical particles. Diffusion potential. Photons and atoms.

PHY-4200: Astronomical Instrumentation (3 credits)

Description

Beyond the diversity of techniques to often each wavelength area, this course presents the physical basis underlying the instruments (telescopes, spectrometers, detectors, etc.) and discuss the ultimate performance and limitations. The main topics are the earth’s atmosphere, photometry, measurement and signal processing, receivers, telescope and spectral analysis. This course is given every two years in odd years, the winter session.

PHY-4201: Introduction to General Relativity (3 credits)

Description

Recall of tensor algebra and tensor calculus. Integration, variation and symmetry. Special relativity revisited. The principles of general relativity. Field equations. Energy-momentum tensor. Structure of field equations. Schwarzschild solution. Experimental verification of general relativity. Applications to black holes, gravitational waves and cosmology.

REQUIREMENTS 2-3 In 12 CREDITS

Pass the course ANL-2020 Intermediate English II. The student who demonstrates that he has acquired this level can choose an English course higher. If he has acquired the Advanced level English II, he may choose a course of another modern language.

REQUIREMENTS 3-0 AMONG 6 CREDITS:

BIO-1250: Physical Oceanography (3 credits)

Description

Distribution of marine waters. Formation of the oceans. Ocean. Origin water. Seawater, T-S diagram. Platforms and gear: visiting a research vessel. Intensity and spectrum of the incident light. Heat preservation and heat balance. Estuarine and oceanic circulations. Geostrophic currents, tides. Oceans and climate. Satellite oceanography. Modeling. Examples of movement: the Atlantic and Arctic oceans.

BPH-2001: Introduction to Biophotonics (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to introduce students to the different application fields of biophotonics. It has a particular emphasis on the introduction of basic concepts of the disciplines supporting biophotonics that are necessary to understand and apply biophotonics. These concepts come from the biological sciences, chemistry, physics and engineering. The interdisciplinary aspects and applications of biophotonics are privileged, involving a number of relevant disciplines. This course is offered remotely.

CHM-1900: Physical chemistry applied to wood (3 credits)

Description

Relationship between the electronic configuration and physicochemical properties of the elements. Concept of the chemical bond in the wave model. Hybridization of atomic orbitals and molecular geometry. Single bonds, multiples, aromaticity and resonance. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. Physicochemical properties of alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Notions of stereochemistry. Examples of parent compounds of wood. The acid-base equilibria. Application for organic compounds. Buffer solutions. Properties saline solutions: hydrolysis. Calculation and pH measurement. Redox. Standard potentials and spontaneous reactions. Examples of applications in wood processing. Laboratories: redox; complexometry; electrochemistry; viscosimetry and tensiometry; polarimetry.

GCI-1005: Environmental Engineering Introduction (3 credits)

Description

Introductory course in environmental engineering. Origin of environmental problems. Scientific basis of environmental engineering: mass balances, calculations of reactor concepts, energy balances. Introduction to water treatment (drinking water production, wastewater treatment) and urban waste management (waste characteristics, recovery, recycling, landfilling and incineration).

GCI-2009: Hydrology (3 credits)

Description

Main components of the hydrological cycle. Precipitation, infiltration, evaporation and evapotranspiration, runoff. Watershed. Phases water. Frequency curve and return period. Metamorphosis and snowmelt. Mechanics of groundwater flow. Recharge. Estimation and Flood Forecasting. Operation of water. Rates learned.

GCI-3001: Environmental Impacts (3 credits)

Description

This course helps to learn the impact studies and develop methodological tools for such studies. It includes a review of federal and provincial impact assessment and their regulatory process; the review of available methods, types case studies of recent projects; the identification and management of conflicts of environmental impacts. Notions of environmental auditing.

GEL-2001: Signal Analysis (3 credits)

Description

Common signal Definitions and properties: ramp, gate level; impulse and distribution concept; periodic signals and properties; power and energy of a signal. Linear time-invariant systems in time: impulse response; convolution calculation of the output of a system. Fourier transform: Fourier series; Fourier transform; transforms conventional signals; properties (linearity, duality, symmetry, translation, scaling factor, convolution and multiplication); power spectral densities and energy; Parseval relationship. Applications of the Fourier transform: sampling theorem; heterodyning; amplitude modulation, frequency, pulse.

GEL-4201: Optical Communications (3 credits)

Description

This course provides basic knowledge on the operation and the operating conditions of the main elements of optical communications systems. It addresses the characteristics of the propagation of light in an optical fiber, the sources of the semiconductor light, photodetectors, optical amplifiers and connectors. It introduces the student to equipment and measuring techniques to assess the properties of these components. It describes the digital coherent optical communications having the modulation formats, the wavelength-division multiplexing and network architectures. It discusses the design of a system for optical communications and assessing the performance of a link in the error rate measurement. It deals with topical issues such as the deployment of fiber to the home.

GIF-1002: Logic Devices (3 credits)

Description

The course shows the organization of digital systems through the wired logic. Binary coding base and numbers. Boolean algebra and logic elements (doors), combinatorial circuits synthesis with doors and MSI (multiplexers and decoders). Circuits (ROM, PLA and PAL, RAM). Synchronous elements (flip-flops RS, T, D and JK, registers, counters). Analysis and synthesis of synchronous sequential circuits from flops, registers and counters with or without multiplexer directly or indirectly addressed with or without external input. Microprogrammed sequencers. Practical work on mounting plate and simulations performed by software.

GLG-1000: Planet Earth (3 credits)

Description

This course is a broad academic audience, as one who wishes to complete his training in science or engineering as one that cares about its physical environment. None required beforehand. Earth – a history of 4.6 billion years of Earth origin, internal structure, dynamics of the terrestrial globe, continental drift and plate tectonics, volcanism, mountain ranges, first continental cores, birth of the Atlantic, major glaciations. Life through geologic time: the appearance of life on Earth, highlights the evolution, large extinctions. The geological landscape: modeling continents by water and ice, groundwater, oceans. Geological riches: minerals, rocks and fossils, gems and precious stones, mineral deposits and oil fields, exploration and mineral economics. Haiti’s geology and history.

GLG-1004: Geophysics globe (3 credits)

Description

Contributions of geophysics to the understanding of our planet Earth and the development of the theory of plate tectonics. Internal constitution of the globe and geodynamics within the constraints defined by geophysics: tectonics on a sphere, reconstruction of the past movement of lithospheric plates with the geomagnetism, study of earthquakes and seismic wave propagation within the Earth, gravity, radioactivity and isotopic dating, thermal behavior and age of the Earth, mechanisms of global tectonics, physics of oceanic and continental lithospheres.

GLG-1006: Paleontology and Evolution (3 credits)

Description

This course provides an overview of the subject by integrating geological and paleontological data (specimens are presented in the lab) and the modern concepts of phylogenetic systematics and evolutionary biology. The applied aspects of biostratigraphy, palaeoecology and sedimentary geology are related to the major stages of evolution. The course focuses mainly on invertebrates (phylogeny, taphonomy, diagenesis), but also deals with fossilization of microbial communities (stromatolites), history of plankton (siliceous, calcareous) and some micro-organisms (foraminifera). Some notes on the history of vertebrates and plants complete the course. The course attaches importance to practical work (identification, relationship between the skeleton and the body, biominerals, microstructures, conservation).

GMC-1003: Introduction to fluid mechanics (3 credits)

Description

Fluid properties and fundamental concepts. Fluid statics. Kinematics of fluids. Dynamics of a non-viscous incompressible fluid. Basic applications of conservation of mass principles, momentum, angular momentum. Some fluid mechanics measurement techniques. Differential analysis of fluid flows: mass conservation, potential flow, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. Dimensional analysis and model theory.

GMC-2005: Applied Fluid Dynamics (3 credits)

Description

Internal incompressible flow: laminar and turbulent regimes in the pipes by friction pressure losses, local losses, pump power, systems with multiple pipes, flow measurement. Incompressible external flows: boundary layer concept, transition and separation, friction drag and pressure drag, body shapes and not profiles, lift force. Compressible flows: thermodynamics, classification, isentropic flow, application to nozzles and diffusers, straight shock waves.

GML-1001: Materials Engineering (3 credits)

Description

Materials characterization methods. Cohesion and strength of materials. Atomic architecture. Materials under stress. Behavior of mixtures. Mechanical, thermal, electrical and magnetic. Metals and metal alloys, polymers, composites, wood and concrete. Degradation of materials.

HST-2901: History of Mathematics (3 credits)

Description

Mathematics before the Greeks (Egypt and Babylon). The axioms of Euclid. Indian and Arabic mathematics. Analytic geometry. Calculus. Developments since 1800; Topics selected from: non-Euclidean geometries, set theory, modern axiomatic (Hilbert), number theory, introduction of algebraic structures, etc. Overview of recent developments.

IFT-1003: Analysis and Design of Information Systems (3 credits)

Description

Study of the main modeling and design of information systems. Development phases of an information system. Characterization of analysis and design phases. Differentiating levels of conceptual and logical modeling and physical design. Main stages of a needs analysis. Key conceptual modeling techniques of data (eg. Approach entity association) and processes (eg. Information flow diagrams). Illustration on an existing system. Main logical data modeling techniques. Physical design data. Main technical design treatments: structured treatments diagrams, passing data flow diagrams to structured treatment diagrams, modularization treatment.

IFT-1903: Computer Engineering (3 credits)

Description

Approach problem solving in engineering. Elements of algorithms required for the resolution of proposed problems. Verifications and validations of responses software used. Introduction to software Maple and Matlab for symbolic calculations for numerical calculations.

IFT-1904: C ++ Programming with Linux (4 credits)

Description

Introduction to the issue of structured programming, by purpose and UML modeling. Development Tools in a Linux environment. Types, control structures, functions, parameter passing mode, pointers and dynamic memory allocation. Classes and Objects: Types, constructor and copy constructor, destructor, surdéfinition functions and operators, data structures with objects, friend functions. Streams and formatting. Technical inheritance, protection levels, multiple inheritance and virtual. Polymorphism. Virtual functions. Patrons of functions and classes.

IFT-2103: Programming of video games (3 credits)

Description

Study of the entire process of designing a 3D video game. Storyboarding, character design, 3D modeling, animation of a Biped, programming in a 3D environment, Camera Management, physics, collisions. The focus is more on results and on the development of a project that session is the production of a video game. Powerful and modern tools are used to carry out the work. The course is given in part laboratory and part class.

MAT-2910: Numerical Analysis for Engineers (3 credits)

Description

Numerical computation. Linear algebra. Solving nonlinear systems. Approximation. Integration and derivation. Finite differences. Differential equations of the first order.

STT-1000: Probability and Statistics (3 credits)

Description

Probability theory. Laws for discrete and continuous variables. Bivariate discrete laws. Descriptive statistics. Point estimation and confidence interval. Tests of parametric assumptions one and two populations. Analysis of variance. Regression and correlation. The study of the concepts of continuous random variables is done using the calculus.

and all courses BIO codes (with the exception of BIO-1909), BCM, BCX and MCB

RULE 4 : 0-9 AMONG CREDITS :

DDU-1000: Foundations for Sustainable Development (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course to sustainable development is for all undergraduate student. It is to provide an introduction to the concept of different sizes and the implementation of sustainable development tools. It allows the student to acquire the basic elements of a general reflection on sustainable development, which takes into account its many ambiguities and difficulties in its operationalization. In addition, this course encourages thinking about the tools necessary for his apprehension as social project. This interdisciplinary course is delivered remotely to autumn sessions, winter and summer. This course is mandatory sustainability profile.

ENT-1000: Know undertake: the passion to create and act (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course in entrepreneurship is for any student in the first cycle. It aims to develop a sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in students, to help them discover and exploit its full entrepreneurial potential. The knowledge imparted to students relate to both the entrepreneur and the creative process by which he leads his project to fruition, be it a social project, commercial, cooperative, artistic or otherwise. Concrete examples are given to illustrate the passion of entrepreneurs, their need to create and innovate and action orientation. Available in class or distance, the course plays a key role in the development of entrepreneurial skills. The course includes the realization of an entrepreneurial sketch to sensitize the students to the realities of an entrepreneurial project and develop a more just vision of the challenges to consider. The sketch is not a comprehensive business plan, the progress of the course remains primarily the discovery and development of the entrepreneurial potential of the student and not the creation of a company.

LP-3900: Recognition of student involvement (3 credits)

Description

Acquisition of additional training through involvement in an association or a student group, under the organization of student activity or participation in the work of certain bodies of the GOC University . The student involvement promotes the development of personal skills, such skills in management, in coordination and planning. It also allows the student to develop his ability to work in teams to show autonomy, to communicate well, to be creative and show an openness to change. The student can not register directly for the course. He must file an application for evaluation of Student Affairs Service.

and all courses in the following disciplines: ANT, ARC, ARD, ARL, ART, ART, CAT, CIN, COM, DRT, EAN, EDC, ETN, FRN, GGR, HAR, HST, JOU, MUS, IHP, POL, PSY, RLT, SCR, SHR, STC, SVS, THL, THT

LPG-3900 course can be selected only upon approval.

MERGER

ASTROPHYSICS 12 CREDITS

RULE 1-12 AMONG CREDITS:

GPH-4101: Introduction to optical design (3 credits)

Description

The course allows students to understand the issues of the use of optical components. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the optical design process and how to use an optical design software. The course emphasizes the geometric optics, optical materials, aberrations, the image quality and design of optical systems.

PHY-2100: Space Science (3 credits)

Description

This course is for students enrolled in science and engineering program or geomatics. It is an introduction to space research and the specific problems of space. Space probes and artificial satellites. The space environment and use. Terrestrial and planetary atmospheres atmospheric luminescence. Cosmic energy sources. Astrodynamics elements. Space exploration. Scientific and technical programs. Canadian Space Policy.

PHY-2200: Astrophysics (3 credits)

Description

Physical concepts and basic astrophysics. Random processes in astrophysics. Photons and relativistic particles. Electromagnetic processes in the Universe. Quantum astrophysical processes. Stellar rays. Process of generating energy in the stars. Compact objects. Properties of galaxies. Physics of the interstellar medium. Structure of the Universe and Cosmology. This course is given at the winter session in even years.

PHY-3202: Project I (3 credits)

Description

Experimental or theoretical work done under the guidance of a teacher and according to established procedures.

PHY-4200: Astronomical Instrumentation (3 credits)

Description

Beyond the diversity of techniques to often each wavelength area, this course presents the physical basis underlying the instruments (telescopes, spectrometers, detectors, etc.) and discuss the ultimate performance and limitations. The main topics are the earth’s atmosphere, photometry, measurement and signal processing, receivers, telescope and spectral analysis. This course is given every two years in odd years, the winter session.

PHY-4201: Introduction to General Relativity (3 credits)

Description

Recall of tensor algebra and tensor calculus. Integration, variation and symmetry. Special relativity revisited. The principles of general relativity. Field equations. Energy-momentum tensor. Structure of field equations. Schwarzschild solution. Experimental verification of general relativity. Applications to black holes, gravitational waves and cosmology.

OPTICS 12 CREDITS

RULE 1-12 AMONG CREDITS:

GEL-2001: Signal Analysis (3 credits)

Description

Common signal definitions and properties: ramp, gate level; impulse and distribution concept; periodic signals and properties; power and energy of a signal. Linear time-invariant systems in time: impulse response; convolution calculation of the output of a system. Fourier transform: Fourier series; Fourier transform; transforms conventional signals; properties (linearity, duality, symmetry translation, scaling factor, convolution and multiplication); power spectral densities and energy; Parseval relationship. Applications of the Fourier transform: sampling theorem; heterodyning; amplitude modulation, frequency, pulse.

GEL-4201: Optical Communications (3 credits)

Description

This course provides basic knowledge on the operation and the operating conditions of the main elements of optical communications systems. It addresses the characteristics of the propagation of light in an optical fiber, the sources of the semiconductor light, photodetectors, optical amplifiers and connectors. It introduces the student to equipment and measuring techniques to assess the properties of these components. It describes the digital coherent optical communications having the modulation formats, the wavelength-division multiplexing and network architectures. It discusses the design of a system for optical communications and assessing the performance of a link in the error rate measurement. It deals with topical issues such as the deployment of fiber to the home.

GPH-2102: Fiber optic (4 credits)

Description

Guided Optics: electromagnetic theory of the plan guide (TE-TM); geometric model; coupling two guides plans; introduction to integrated optics. Integrated Optics Laboratory: fabrication and characterization of a plan guide; study of coupling two guides. Optical fiber: propagation of a pulse in a dispersive medium; electromagnetic theory of fiber step-index; Introduction to fiber optic communications; introduction to fiber optic sensors. Laboratory fiber: characterization of a single-mode and multimode fiber; construction of a fiber optic communication system; fabricating an optical fiber sensor.

GPH-3100: Fundamentals of Photonics (3 credits)

Description

Topics covered: electromagnetic waves; light polarization, wave propagation in media; structural and intrinsic anisotropy; electro-optical; magneto-optical; acousto-optical; Introduction to nonlinear optics. Objectives: at the end of the course, students should be able to analyze the interaction between the anisotropic and polarized light, manipulating different polarization components and design electro modulators, magneto-optical and acousto.

GPH-4100: Lasers and Applications (3 credits)

Description

Model of the classic oscillator and stimulated emission. Electric dipole transitions. Evolution equations. Laser amplification. Optical cavities and feedback. Laser beams and types of resonators. Applications of lasers in materials processing, remote sensing, telecommunications and medicine.

GPH-4101: Introduction to optical design (3 credits)

Description

The course allows students to understand the issues of the use of optical components. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the optical design process and how to use an optical design software. The course emphasizes the geometric optics, optical materials, aberrations, the image quality and design of optical systems.

GPH-4102: Hands-oriented biophotonics (3 credits)

Description

Practical work on relevant experimental techniques in biophotonics. Microscopy: resolution limits, acquisition and processing of digital images. Scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence phenomenon. Raman spectroscopy. Optical tweezers: manipulation and force measurement in the micrometer scale. Photometry and characterization of tissue.

PHY-3202: Project I (3 credits)

Description

Experimental or theoretical work done under the guidance of a teacher and according to established procedures.

NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND MEDICAL 12 CREDITS

RULE 1-12 AMONG CREDITS:

BPH-2001: Introduction to Biophotonics (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to introduce students to the different application fields of biophotonics. It has a particular emphasis on the introduction of the basics of biophotonics supporting disciplines that are necessary to understand and apply biophotonics. These concepts come from the biological sciences, chemistry, physics and engineering. The interdisciplinary aspects and applications of biophotonics are privileged, involving a number of relevant disciplines. This course is offered remotely.

GPH-3003: Hands-Biomedical Engineering (3 credits)

Description

This laboratory allows students to further explore the concepts associated with the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. By combining theory views in previous courses in a series of experiments (Compton, photoelectric, neutron activation, radiation protection), the participant is better able to reflect critically on some key issues for medical applications (radioisotope production , X-ray beams from a medical linear accelerator). The notions of projection imaging (X-rays) and 3D computed tomography imaging (scanner, PET) are also studied in detail: contrast, resolution, modulation transfer function.

GPH-4102: Hands-oriented biophotonics (3 credits)

Description

This laboratory allows students to further explore the concepts associated with the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. By combining theory views in previous courses in a series of experiments (Compton, photoelectric, neutron activation, radiation protection), the participant is better able to reflect critically on some key issues for medical applications (radioisotope production , X-ray beams from a medical linear accelerator). The notions of projection imaging (X-rays) and 3D computed tomography imaging (scanner, PET) are also studied in detail: contrast, resolution, modulation transfer function.

PHY-3202: Project I (3 credits)

Description

Experimental or theoretical work done under the guidance of a teacher and according to established procedures.

PHY-3501: Particle Physics (3 credits)

Description

Elements of quantum theory. Particle detectors and accelerators. Invariance principle and conservation laws. Hadron-hadron interactions. Quark model. Electromagnetic interactions. Weak interactions. Quark-quark interactions. Unification of forces.

PHY-4000: Medical Imaging (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the various modern medical imaging modalities that are frequently encountered in both the diagnosis (radiology and nuclear medicine) for assistance to cancer treatments. We are interested in the physical principles underlying technological advances and their impact on image quality.

STT-1000: Probability and Statistics (3 credits)

Description

Probability theory. Laws for discrete and continuous variables. Bivariate discrete laws. Descriptive statistics. Point estimation and confidence interval. Tests of parametric assumptions one and two populations. Analysis of variance. Regression and correlation. The study of the concepts of continuous random variables is done using the calculus.

PHYSICAL THEORETICAL CREDITS 12

RULE 1-12 AMONG CREDITS:

PHY-2500: physics ideas Evolution (3 credits)

Description

Summary of main areas of classical physics and foundations of modern physics, reconsidered from the point of view of their historical development. Classical mechanics. The light. Electromagnetism. Heat: thermodynamics in the kinetic theory of gases. Relativity. Quantum mechanics. This course is given every two years in even years, in the winter session.

PHY-2501: Mathematical Methods in Physics (3 credits)

Description

Infinite series: convergence criteria, summation techniques and asymptotic series. Complex analysis: complex functions, Cauchy, Laurent expansion, calculation of residues. Tensor analysis: operations and the tensor, covariant form in physical laws. Introduction to group theory. This course is given in the winter semester in odd years.

PHY-2502: Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complexity (3 credits)

Description

Nonlinear dynamics in 1 and 2 dimensions: historical introduction, autonomous systems of order 1, the bifurcation theory (1D), autonomous systems of order 2 and Hamiltonian systems with one degree of freedom. The deterministic chaos: introduction, autonomous systems of order 3, discrete dynamical systems (1D applications) and measures of chaos. Special topics: numerical analysis, fractal geometry, chaos control and synchronization of dynamic reconstruction, complex analytic dynamics, Hamiltonian dynamics, complexity and chaos.

PHY-3202: Project I (3 credits)

Description

Experimental or theoretical work done under the guidance of a teacher and according to established procedures.

PHY-3500: Computational Physics (3 credits)

Description

This course provides a working knowledge of basic methods own scientific computing. Numerical methods are used for the solution of problems encountered in physics: ordinary differential equations, border issues and values, special functions and quadrature Gaussian, data analysis, matrix operations, elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations, and stochastic methods.

PHY-3501: Particle Physics (3 credits)

Description

Elements of quantum theory. Particle detectors and accelerators. Invariance principle and conservation laws. Hadron-hadron interactions. Quark model. Electromagnetic interactions. Weak interactions. Quark-quark interactions. Unification of forces.

PHY-4015: Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

Description

Historical development of quantum mechanics. Spin and angular momentum. Theory stationary disturbances. Approximation methods for time-dependent problems. Identical particles. Diffusion potential. Photons and atoms.

PHY-4201: Introduction to general relativity (3 credits)

Description

Recall of tensor algebra and tensor calculus. Integration, variation and symmetry. Special relativity revisited. The principles of general relativity. Field equations. Energy-momentum tensor. Structure of field equations. Schwarzschild solution. Experimental verification of general relativity. Applications to black holes, gravitational waves and cosmology.

PROFILES OF STUDY

International profile

EHE-1PHY: Studies – International profile – Bachelor’s degree in physics (12 to 18 credits)

Description

Activities carried out in a university abroad, under international profile, which will be equivalencies student record upon presentation of the official transcript of the activities.

Course Information
  • Course Id:PHY
Instructors