School of Psychology

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

BACHELOR (LICENSE) IN PSYCHOLOGY (B. A.)

OBJECTIVE

If BA provides a balanced basic training in scientific psychology and professional psychology. Scientifically, it includes the acquisition of advanced knowledge about normal and pathological behaviors as well as the acquisition of practical research skills. Professionally, it enables the acquisition of knowledge on clinical and community approaches, an introduction to methods of assessment and intervention and the development of appropriate attitudes to exercise that profession. The program also helps to deepen the main theories and fields of application of psychology. Finally, your training will touch on several aspects of biological sciences, social sciences and research methodology.

Abilities

Love the study of human behavior and appreciate it for its usefulness in different spheres of life. Listening people. Have a curious nature and desire to further the study and understanding of human phenomena. Rigor, openness and maturity. Having the ability to communicate.

Opportunity

The psychologist is a professional who has a university undergraduate education followed by a doctoral specialty training in psychology. This training focuses on the understanding of normal and pathological behaviors and learning methods of assessment and intervention in clinical psychology, clinical neuropsychology, as well as social and community psychology. The psychologist has acquired scientific knowledge on the behavior and practical training that enable it to design and implement an assessment program and an intervention plan.

Their title is protected, all psychologists must have at least a doctorate in Psychology giving the right to practice the profession. Bachelors in Psychology may not be members of that professional order. The PhD program immediately following the bachelor studies.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Psychology can occupy various functions depending on their journey, their fields of interests and abilities.

Professions

Probation Officer

Spiritual Life And Community Involvement Animator

Researcher (PHD is Required To Enter The Job)

Employment Counselor

Evaluation And Social Research Advisor

Counseling Consultant

Teacher College

Expert Psycholégal (Doctorate is Required to Enter the Job)

Social Worker

Clinical Neuropsychologist (The Doctorate is Required to Enter the Job)

Clinical Psychologist (PHD is Required to Enter the Job)

Community Psychologist (PHD is Required to Enter the Job)

Industrial And Organizational Psychologist (PHD is Required to Enter the Job)

School Psychologist (PHD is Required to Enter the Job)

Psychologist Specializing In Mediation (The Doctorate is Required to Enter the Job)


Employers

Probation Offices

Rehabilitation Centers

Hospitals

Youth Centers

Medical Clinics

Private Clinics

Educational Institutions

Public Function

Ministries And Public and Parapublic Organizations

Community Organizations

Corrections

OPEN TO SENIOR PROGRAMS

The BA in Psychology leads to graduate studies in related disciplines: speech therapy, science orientation, administrative sciences, anthropology, public affairs and industrial relations. To facilitate admission to these programs, gateways consist of sequences of courses in these disciplines are planned. The graduates may also pursue master’s research in psychology.

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION

All requirements must be met when undertaking the program.

The applicant must meet the following requirements:

Be 18 years or older.

Hold a high school diploma (Bac II) or its equivalent.

Having left school early.

Applicants presenting a combination of education and relevant experience deemed equivalent to that required of the holder applicant may be eligible as a result of the analysis of the file.

The program is limited enrollment, the number of places is very limited.

Selection criteria

The application is analyzed on the basis of the quality of academic record.

Laptop Computer

In undertaking its program, the student must acquire, from the first session, a portable computer equipped with a number of software, allowing the applicant to undertake the course of his research. Proficiency in basic computer functions and common software is essential. Introductory courses to specialized software are offered outside the program.

Knowledge of French

The student admitted to the EP must comply with the provisions relating to the implementation of the policy on the use of French at the University GOC

Non-francophone candidate

The candidate whose language of instruction in primary and secondary education is not the French must demonstrate a minimum level of knowledge of the French language. His skills in written French will be assessed on arrival and, where applicable, a patch French courses could be added to its journey.

 

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

Bachelor (Licence) in Psychology (B. A.)

*This page presents the official version of the program. The University G.O.C. reserves the right to change the content without notice.

CSO – Counseling and Guidance

CSO1004               Psychology of Small Groups

CSO1101               Developmental Psychology And Adaptation

CSO1102               Psychology of Adolescence

CSO1304               Psychology of Working Adult

CSO1900               Psychology of The Young Adult And Adult

EHE – Studies Off-Campus

EHE1PSY               Studies – International Profile – Bachelor of Psychology

GPL – Multidisciplinary Studies

GPL3153                Intercultural Awareness Training in Psychology I

KIN – Kinesiology

KIN1006                Sports Psychology and Performance

MRK – Marketing

MRK6082              Consumer Psychology

ORT – Speech

ORT6013               Cognitive Psychology of Oral and Written Language

IHP – Philosophy

PHI1117                Aristotle Psychology

PPG – Psychology

PPG6004               Strategic Teaching: Contribution of Cognitive Psychology

PPG7029               Cognitive Psychology and Pedagogical Intervention

PSY – Psychology

PSY0100                Introduction to Psychology

PSY1002                Neuropsychology and Neuroscience I

PSY1003                Psychology of Perception

PSY1006                Social Psychology

PSY1008                Introduction to Clinical Psychology

PSY1010                Environmental and Community Aspects In Psychology

PSY1102                Psychology of Motivation

PSY1103                Psychology Gerontological

PSY1104                Family Psychology

PSY1106                Health Psychology

PSY1700                Foundations of Psychology

PSY1902                Psychology and Work

PSY1903                Theater and Psychology of Perception

PSY2104                Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology

PSY2110                Psychology of Addictions

PSY2111                Psychology Suicide

PSY2113                Psychology and Cultures

PSY2114                Psychology and Evolution

PSY2115                Cyberpsychology

PSY3000                Neuropsychology and Neuroscience II

PSY3001                Psychology: History and Systems

PSY3152                Psychology Applied to Employment

PSY6100                Directed Readings In Psychology

PSY6101                Special Topics (Psychology)

PSY7002                Advanced Seminar In Social Psychology

PSY7009                Cognitive Psychology Attention

PSY7012                Applied Cognitive Psychology

PSY7017                Research Ethics in Psychology

PSY8000                Ethics And Ethics of The Practice Of Psychology

PSY8001                Directed Readings in Psychology

PSY8002S             Special Ujets (Psychology)

PSY8006                Clinical Psychology Research Methods

PSY8025                Family And Social Interventions In Neuropsychology

PSY8034                Clinical Health Psychology

PSY8035                Clinical Psychology of the Elderly

PSY8041                Doctoral Internship in Psychology A

PSY8042                Internship Doctorate in Psychology B

TRACKING PROGRAM – (96 credits)

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYCHOLOGY CREDITS 45

MAT-1904: Quantitative Methods I (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To know and apply the descriptive and inferential statistical techniques commonly used in psychology. Contents: types of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, linear transformations, the normal distribution, correlation and regression, mean comparisons (t-tests and ANOVA).

PSY-1000: Child Development (3 credits)

Description

This course of development, from conception to the end of childhood. Given by a group of professors, the course discusses the current state of knowledge, issues, their scientific basis and key concepts of each of the main aspects of development of the physical, cognitive, emotional and social.

PSY-1001: Theories of Personality (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on the introduction, presentation and integration of certain personality theories by comparing and evaluating their ability to describe, explain and predict the behavior of individuals. It specifically covers the major personality theories of the approach (perspective) psychoanalytic, humanist and existential, cognitive-behavioral and provisions. It also provides an introduction to personality disorders presenting their diagnostic criteria and approaches to treating these disorders.

PSY-1002: Neuroscience and Neuropsychology I (3 credits)

Description

Presentation of the basic concepts in this area. Functional anatomy and nervous system development. Nerve conduction and synaptic transmission. Anatomical and physiological analysis of sensory and motor systems. Attentional processes and language. Neuroendocrine mechanisms.

SRM-2001: Psychometrics (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To acquire good knowledge of the main theoretical, methodological and practical measurement in psychology and psychometric tests. Content: fidelity and validity of a measuring instrument, standards, broad categories of tests, steps in the development of measuring instruments, choice and critical analysis of a test.

PSY-1003: Psychology of Perception (3 credits)

Description

Objective: the student must be familiar with the relativity of perception and understanding certain concepts, mechanisms and principles (perceptual constancy, lateral inhibition, etc.) to interpret some perceptual phenomena. Content: psychophysics: concepts and methods; nervous system and sense; hearing; balanced; chemical senses; somesthesia; vision (color, shape, space, movement); time; Warning.

PSY-1004: Psychopathology (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To distinguish the main forms of psychological maladjustment in adults. Content: Theoretical models in psychopathology; etiology and clinical picture, according to research various psychopathologies. Examples of maladaptive case.

PSY-1005: Research Methods (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce students to the methodology of scientific research as applied in psychology. Acquire the necessary skills to determine the nature and sources of error of research; the critique of scientific literature method, the creation of research designs used in psychology.

PSY-2000: Development, from adolescence to the end of life (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: provide an overview of development, from adolescence to the end of life. Adolescence is addressed through the following topics: physical growth, sexual maturation, cognitive development and identity, emotional independence and social autonomy. Adult life course is examined through its transitions and crises, in the light of three stages: chronological, social and historical. Old age is discussed in terms of sensory changes, cognitive, emotional and psychosocial experienced seniors.

PSY-1006: Social Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Objective: enable the student to become familiar with the field of social psychology, both in terms of theoretical knowledge of the scientific research process. Content: theoretical perspectives in social psychology, social perception, attitudes, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, social influence, conformity, help and violence behavior.

PSY-1007: Cognitive Processes (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: make the student to analyze key mental processes from the information processing approach and identify key concepts and key appropriate experimental methods. Content: perceptual processes and care, short-term memory and long-term, knowledge representation.

PSY-1008: Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Know the objectives and specific clinical psychology methods. Acquire the basics of the main forms of psychotherapy based on evidence. Knowing the different areas of intervention of clinical psychology, as well as their characteristics and peculiarities.

PSY-1010: environmental and community aspects in psychology (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on aspects of the physical and social environment that influence the development and human behavior, mental health and quality of life. It aims to explain the mechanisms by which these influences are exerted and by what means it is possible to intervene to counter the effects of “toxic” environments and promote healthy living conditions. This course draws on own models and concepts in environmental psychology and community psychology. It illustrates the practical benefits of these disciplines in the fields of public health and community mental health.

PSY-3000: Neuroscience and Neuropsychology II (3 credits)

Description

Associative cortex and cognitive and affective functions. Neuropsychology of memory, emotions and motivation. Schizophrenia. Addictions and compulsions. Neurothérapies and neuroethics.

PSY-3001: Psychology: History and Systems (3 credits)

Description

Objective: The course aims to understand how have developed some fields of psychology, in order to stimulate reflection on the current and potential states of psychology as academic and social discipline. Content: epistemology notions; the beginnings of psychology; notions of measurement; Mental Health; psychoanalysis and schools; behaviorism; humanism; contemporary psychologies; Psychology in different countries; themes to choose from.

Other Requirements Program (45 Credits)

REQUIREMENTS 1-0 3 CREDITS TO

Pass the course ANL-3010 Advanced English I. The student who demonstrates that he has acquired this level (TOEIC: 750) during the test administered by the School of Languages can choose an English graduate courses or s it acquired the Advanced level English II (TOEIC: 825), a course of another modern language, a supplementary training course or an elective course in psychology.[/su_note]

REQUIREMENTS 2-15 CREDITS-24

With the agreement of the program director, students may choose one or more courses other than those listed below.

ADS-1902: Education and disadvantaged (3 credits)

Description

Develop and apply a critical approach to social assumptions used to make the analysis of relations between education and disadvantaged backgrounds. Study the various solutions that have been attempted in recent decades in North America to intervene in disadvantaged areas. Identify the face of poverty by identifying the most vulnerable groups and their relation to education.

ADS-1904: School system in Haiti (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to raise awareness and understanding of the essence of the school system through its dynamic organization: structures, rules, reform, constraints, educational projects, educational systems, curricula, evaluation methods and relations work.

ANL-2020: Intermediate English II (3 credits)

Description

Advanced intermediate level course designed for students who can express themselves both orally and in writing in simple everyday situations and who can read and write relatively simple texts. Oral comprehension and writing; oral and written expression. Grammatical structures, vocabulary and idioms, pronunciation.

ANT-1002: Survey Methodology and Ethnography (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic anthropological research techniques in their theoretical and practical aspects, and the process of research: ethnography, reading files, desk research, field research ; ethical and practical research; Working enforcement techniques.

ANT-1004: analysis of qualitative data Methods (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on the analysis of textual qualitative data from documentary materials, open interviews, direct observations or visual materials. The thematic content analysis, structural analysis of the data and the case study are the three main methods discussed. In addition to a theoretical reflection on qualitative methods, the course emphasizes practical learning analyzes with the support of textual data analysis software such as N’Vivo software.

ANT-2000: Theories of Culture (3 credits)

Description

Historical overview and critical examination of the concept of culture in anthropology. Getting to the currents and the major concepts that have contributed to improve the analysis and understanding of the meanings and cultural phenomena; Special attention is paid to a semiotic approach to culture and the interpretive approach. Faced with globalization, reflections on the circulation of cultural signs and some contemporary uses the concept of culture.

ANT-2001 History and theories of anthropology II (3 credits)

Description

This course allows the student to become familiar with the currents of the anthropology that are in a critical perspective questioning the relations between powers, ideologies and economies. Analysis of the concepts and approaches of critical topics, including historical materialism, feminist perspectives and rereading the classics by the postmodern.

ANT-3003: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to consolidate and expand theoretical and conceptual achievements of students by reviewing recent theoretical trends concerning anthropological debates and current social issues.

COM-1000: Introduction to Communication (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the concepts and theories of communication using everyday personal experience of communicative phenomena at the individual, group and mass. Development of analytical skills and knowledge necessary to more advanced or specialized learning.

COM-1004: Journalism and Society (3 credits)

Description

Portrait of the historical development of journalism and its role in a democratic society. Different sociological and economic constraints likely to limit its exercise.

COM-1011: Social Psychology of Communication (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to basic theoretical currents that have marked the development of the psychology of communication: psychoanalysis, behaviorism, shape theory, studies of nonverbal communication. Basics necessary for understanding the effects of a message: attitude, belief, social representation, stereotype. Persuasion study: forms of influence, processes of commitment, print management.

COM-1500: Oral communication in public (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to develop the ability to communicate orally in a heterogeneous group. Study of verbal and nonverbal components required for oral communication quality. Action and oral feedback guided by the teacher, with the logistical support of the video. Note – This course aims to consolidate the general knowledge of French and knowledge of university-level French.

COM-2000: Arguments and Communication (3 credits)

Description

Main argumentative processes used in various public communication practices. Operational definition, identification procedure of the argument, distinctions between different types of arguments and characterization of the argumentative structure.

COM-2150: Communication and attitude change (3 credits)

Description

Presentation of classic American studies on information processing (cognitive, attentional and memorial) and persuasive communication: the influence of the source, the message efficiency factors, theories of balance, theories of planned behavior and the development of probability. At the end of this course the student will know the theories and models used in the design of a social advertising campaign.

COM-2300: Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to basic knowledge required to perform communication strategies: knowledge of the organization, environment, psychology of the individual, public opinion, media and communication techniques. Research tools to acquire each of these knowledge. Procedures for evaluation of the strategies adopted. Public relations as architect of the image of the company (public or private) and its realities management tool.

COM-2303: Communication in Organizations (3 credits)

Description

Initiation to the main theories of communication organizations and the challenges and practices of internal communication (company newsletter, intranet, fashion formal and informal internal communication, etc.). Characteristics of the main organizational settings and description of the main communication management practices in organizations.

COM-2400: Introduction to Social advertising (3 credits)

Description

Marketing, social marketing, social advertising and related phenomena. The basic concepts and approach of marketing and advertising applied to the promotion of ideas and social causes: product analysis, customer analysis, definition of marketing and communication goals, evaluation of campaigns.

COM-4150: International Intercultural Communication (3 credits)

Description

Initiate communication between people from different cultures. Developing awareness, sensitivity, ways of thinking and necessary skills. Two intercultural training approaches: general (prepares interactions in any culture) and specific (informs about a specific culture). Compare communication practices in a dozen cultures. Addressing stereotype notions, prejudices, cultural shock, ethnocentrism, ethnorelativism, etc. Interactive Teaching Method: lectures, discussions, exercises, simulations, case studies, oral presentations and video testimonials.

CRI-1002: Society and Criminal Justice (3 credits)

Description

Understanding the complexity of criminal justice by the comparative analysis and critical thinking. Presentation of theoretical currents, criminal justice models and key anchors of the criminal justice process (concept of justice, ideological foundations, media, public opinion, discretion, ethics, etc.).

CRI-1003: Deviance, delinquency, crime (3 credits)

Description

This course defines the subject of criminology and distinguishes the basic concepts of the discipline. It allows more precisely to know the different explanatory approaches and understanding of deviance and delinquency; to understand the peculiarities of certain criminal groups; to control the operation of the criminal justice system; to grasp the extent of crime in Haiti; to understand how the standards, rules, structures and social organizations contribute to the neutralization, the emergence and maintenance of deviance and delinquency; and finally, to develop critical thinking in relation to theoretical and empirical foundations of criminology.

CRI-2015: Principles of intervention with involuntary clients (3 credits)

Description

The general objective of this course is to develop in students a critical sense of the intervention with clients say no volunteers or in a situation of authority. Ethical and professional issues using coercion, challenges related to informed consent, roles of assistance and control, intervention principles associated with different backgrounds: institutional juvenile, adult and community corrections.

CRI-2114: Social Expertise at court (3 credits)

Description

Integration of theoretical principles and practices of criminological expertise in judicial context. Skill development in criminological expertise in court. Understanding the different laws and ethical framework that govern the work of expertise. Various social assessments specific to the criminologist labor (adult and juvenile delinquency, sentence report, etc.). Planned visit to the courthouse.

CSO-1007: Information and referral process (3 credits)

Description

Familiarization with the analysis of information systems (programs and tools) and the forms of intervention in the direction of science. Evaluation of information for broadcast and professional use with diverse populations. Understanding the rationale behind the various information and referral process, and situate the relevance of their use in the context of the intervention in the direction of science.

CSO-1009: Orientation: educational and psychological perspectives (3 credits)

Description

Problems specific to science and practical orientation are approached from psychological and educational perspectives. Study of different theories of phenomena associated guidance throughout life.

CSO-1200: Clinical Sociology of work (3 credits)

Description

Grasp the real social and psychological processes between determinants in individual and collective relations at work. Rely on the psychodynamics of work and clinical sociology in order to empower researchers and stakeholders to develop clinical work.

CSO-2000: Career Choice and Career Development (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the main concepts, theories, methods and current research related to occupational choice and career development in the field of guidance sciences. The selected angle is that the registration of personal and social identity in the sphere of work.

CSO-2200: Psychosocial intervention (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to principles of psychosocial intervention in guidance, as used in the supervision of postgraduate courses. Overview of the particular philosophy of the approach, differences and similarities with other approaches to intervention counselor. Theoretical explanation of the key concepts and practical exercises to master these concepts.

CSO-2201: Individual intervention counselor (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to enable students to develop their understanding of the links between the principles and practical guidance from an educational perspective. From theoretical references and practical experience, students will be led to reflect on the direction from the point of a process that is part of the development of the person. They will be aware of the various principles and guidance intervention models and learn also to the practice of direction.

CSO-2203: Applied research in the direction of science (3 credits)

Description

Getting to the objects and methods of preferred research in various sectors of the orientation of science. Development and operationalization of a research project operator varied approaches. Exploration data analysis tools and initiation to results interpretation and scientific writing.

CTB-1000: General Accounting (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to develop the student’s ability to understand the functioning of an accounting system for the registration of an operation in the accounting records until the preparation of a complete set of financial statements. Thereafter, he will be able to read, understand, interpret, and broadly analyze financial statements. He will discover the limitations and constraints of financial accounting and will include accounting policy choices that are needed. Finally, learn how accounting information can respond to the needs and concerns of the main users.

CTB-1902: Introduction to Personal Financial Planning (3 credits)

Description

Managing personal finances is a challenge for the college student or recent graduate. This course covers the fundamental aspects of a successful personal planning to achieve financial independence. To notably expenditure management, insurance, investment and retirement planning.

DDU-1000: Foundations for Sustainable Development (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course to sustainable development is for all undergraduate student. It is to provide an introduction to the concept of different sizes and the implementation of sustainable development tools. It allows the student to acquire the basic elements of a general reflection on sustainable development, which takes into account its many ambiguities and difficulties in its operationalization. In addition, this course encourages thinking about the tools necessary for his apprehension as social project.

DRT-1901: General Introduction to Law (3 credits)

Description

This course cannot be followed by students enrolled in the Bachelor of Laws. This course aims to enable students who are not seeking a specialization in law, to learn the history, legal concepts and techniques of Haitian law.

ECN-1100: Health Economics (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the student to the economic analysis of health services: characteristics of demand and supply of services, cost trends, program effectiveness, methods of financing, labor market issues and industry pharmaceuticals. Applications favor the Haitian situation. This course no prior request.

ECN-1902: Economic and Labour Market I (3 credits)

Description

This course consists of an introduction to the economic analysis of the main themes relating to employment, conducted at both the microeconomic and macroeconomic level. Its objectives are, first, to introduce students to key concepts in economics and raise awareness of the diversity of theoretical approaches in this field, secondly, to provide them with a basic knowledge of facts about the market Labour and third, to stimulate a reflection on the contribution of economic analysis to the understanding of contemporary economic phenomena and the formation of public policy.

ECN-2902: Economic and Labour Market II (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to analyze the functioning of the various labor markets according to a microeconomic approach and the choice between individual action and collective action on labor markets. Its objectives are, first, to understand the neoclassical and institutionalist model of the labor market, secondly, to present applications of these models to the analysis of certain phenomena observed in the labor market and, third, to raise reflection on the criteria of validity of scientific theories.

ENT-1000: Know undertake: the passion to create and act (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course in entrepreneurship is for any student in the first cycle. It aims to develop a sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in students, to help them discover and exploit its full entrepreneurial potential. The knowledge imparted to students relate to both the entrepreneur and the creative process by which he leads his project to fruition, be it a social project, commercial, cooperative, artistic or otherwise. Concrete examples are given to illustrate the passion of entrepreneurs, their need to create and innovate and action orientation. Available in class or distance, the course plays a key role in the development of entrepreneurial skills. The course includes the realization of an entrepreneurial sketch to sensitize the students to the realities of an entrepreneurial project and develop a more just vision of the challenges to be considered. The sketch is not a comprehensive business plan, the progress of the course remains primarily the discovery and development of the entrepreneurial potential of the student and not the creation of a company.

EPM-1901: Principles and methods of applied epidemiology (3 credits)

Description

This course allows students to learn the principles and methods of epidemiology and understand the contribution of this science to the study of health problems. It also allows the student to develop the skills required for understanding and critical reading of literature in the health sciences. Goals of epidemiology, types of epidemiological studies, biostatistics elements, concept of causality, concept testing, ethical, application to common health problems.

LP-3153: Intercultural Awareness Training in Psychology I (3 credits)

Description

This course takes the form of an awareness course for the internationalization of the practice and research in the student’s training field. The precise content follows an agreement between the student and the course leader. It must represent a minimum of 270 hours of field work distributed over a minimum of eight consecutive weeks. The preparatory readings and training GOC University before leaving for the selected country are in surplus.

LP-3610: Internship in the Haitian public service (3 credits)

Description

Paid training to acquire practical work experience in the Haitian public service, in an area closely related to bachelor’s degrees in the Faculty of Social Sciences. This course, lasting about 225 hours, must be approved by the program director at registration. The assessment is made by the internship supervisor and environment on the basis of a placement report.

GSF-1020: Business Economics (3 credits)

Description

This course is an introduction to microeconomic analysis applied to business management. It focuses on understanding and application of relevant economic concepts to the business world. The concepts covered include the basics of economics, optimization, supply and demand, incentives of the different economic agents, the structure of production costs and market functioning. The main objective is to improve decision making by highlighting the economic factors that influence the choices of individuals and those of companies and their performance.

LNG-1002: Fundamentals of phonetics and phonology (3 credits)

Description

Phonetic concepts: International Phonetic Alphabet and phonetic transcription; physiology of speech and articulation ranking; Phonetic combinatorial; suprasegmental parameters; acoustic properties of speech sounds; speech perception. Notions of phonology: categorization, phonemes, allophones, minimal pairs; theoretical tools generative phonology: linear representations (distinctive features of matrices), multilinear representations (internal structure of phonemes, syllable, time units, etc.), processes (contextual rules / constraints and not contextual rules); brand (type), redundancy and sub-specification; Theory of Constraints and repair strategies, theory of optimality.

LNG-1003: Glossary and cognitive grammar (3 credits)

Description

Basics of morphology (morpheme lexical and grammatical, bending, derivation and composition), syntax (phrases, syntactic functions, thematic roles, removal of components) and semantic (meaning relationships in the lexicon, semantic representation of utterances, referential semantics, compositional semantics, meaning utterance). Application of the theory to case studies in mental health (agrammatism, Alzheimer, SLI, etc.) or language acquisition difficulties in children.

MED-1100: Health and safety: basics (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of the various disciplines related to the evaluation of health and safety at work and familiarize them with the means of intervention that could improve this situation. Contribution of different disciplines: industrial hygiene, industrial toxicology, epidemiology, safety, ergonomics, industrial psychology. Structures and health intervention mechanisms and safety: legislation, the CSST, the public network, unions and employers.

MED-1900: Clinical Geriatrics Elements (3 credits)

Description

This course will focus on the epidemiology, clinical description, pathophysiology, prognosis and treatment of the most significant pathological entities affecting the elderly (eg. Falls, dementia, incontinence, etc.). Particular attention will be paid to prevention and psychosocial consequences internist.

SRM-3900: Using psychometric tests (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to familiarize students with the main theoretical and practical aspects of the measurement of intelligence, personality and interests. The course introduces the student to the use of the tests used in the community and aims to develop in students a critical approach to the use and interpretation of psychometric tests.

SRM-3901: Evaluation and interpretation of tests (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to empower students to undertake a psychometric assessment process and integrate the results of a battery of instruments to make a thorough interpretation. The course also aims to empower students to present the results of an evaluation process and produce them in the form of a report.

MNG-1000: The company and its management (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the main activities of management in the operation of a business. Following the development of a systemic framework situating the role of managers and the decisions they make are successively discusses the purpose and business strategies, planning, organization, management, control and sharing. Readings and exercises are performed, as well as teamwork. The preferred self-learning formula is supported in class by greater supervision of teacher.

MNG-1001: Organizational Behavior (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to make students aware of the importance of human aspects in the management of organizations and to make them familiar with the basic concepts of organizational behavior such as perception, motivation, group processes, communication, power, leadership, organizational culture, organizational development, career planning, stress. The course takes a multidisciplinary perspective and highlights several levels of analysis, namely individual, group and organization.

MRK-1000: Marketing (3 credits)

Description

This course focuses on key marketing decisions. Most of the course consists of a presentation of the variables of the “marketing mix” (product, communication, distribution and price) in a management perspective. Then, integrating all the strategic planning activity is carried out by the students, using the method of case analysis, and that, in specific application areas: services marketing, international marketing, industrial marketing, marketing innovation and public and social marketing.

MRK-2102: Consumer Behavior (3 credits)

Description

This course provides an overview of the factors that influence consumer behavior. First we linger internal influencing factors: the process of perception, motivation, learning, memory, consumer decision process. Then have studied the influence of external factors: environment and situations, groups including family, culture and innovations. NOTE – It is suggested to follow Marketing MRK-1000, before the course, or concurrently.

PHC-1902: Introduction to Pharmacology (1 credit)

Description

Introduction to principles governing the effects of drugs. Overview of the processes involved in metabolism, kinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs. Study parameters influencing the effect of drugs: age, dose, drug-food interactions, etc. Phenomena of dependence, tolerance and toxicology concepts.

PHC-1903: Drug abuse and alcoholism (3 credits)

Description

Multidisciplinary courses on biological, psychological and social aspects of drug abuse and alcohol: addiction and alcoholism. Understanding these phenomena to improve prevention and treatment.

PHI-1063: Thinking for ourselves: Speech and Silence (3 credits)

Description

This course put primarily on philosophical practice research community. It allows students to improve their critical thinking, creativity, ability to self-correction and the ability to work with others. Knowledge drawn from it is operational, since it comes from practice. It is therefore an introduction for anyone who wants to perfect in the sense that wishes to initiate or groups of people with a similar development. These may be groups of students from primary, secondary, college or university groups with the task of thinking together, whether in the workplace or research environment, groups linked to an organization leisure (young scouts, guides, camps, etc.), groups involved in counseling, parent groups, seniors groups, etc. In this course, participants are called to deepen their thinking on the fundamental role of language in the representation and expression of our experience.

PHI-1900: Logical Principles (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to make known some of the tools of thought and above all to show how to use them to better arrange the existing knowledge or those under development. We learn to analyze a text or a point of view, to bring out the essential, defining the concepts involved, to distinguish and evaluate the arguments involved. Such training is proving an asset to profitably address any field of study. It also assists in drafting more precise and coherent texts. As this is a basic course requires no previous training in logic. It may be followed by people in any field, as well, of course, by those who are enrolled in a philosophy program.

POL-1006: Introduction to Public Administration (3 credits)

Description

Public administrations are at the heart of contemporary transformations of public action and prerogatives of States. By comparing several systems of public administration and particularly in the case of developing government in Haiti, this course analyzes the major recent developments in Western bureaucracies. Also discussed the main concepts and theories that structure this research field.

POL-2202: Haitian Public Administration (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to familiarize students to the operation of Haitian governments. The classic themes of public administration are addressed in order to present the practical operation in Haiti: administrative organization, public service, decision making, administrative cycle, the budget process and finally the control of the administration. Still in a concrete perspective, the course also introduces current topics such as the new public management and privatization.

PPG-1901: Nursery and Daycare (3 credits)

Description

Origins of community services for young children. Needs of children and parents. Systems and service packages: inventory and analysis. Laws and regulations. Clienteles. Arrangements, schedules, programs, materials and assessment in kindergarten and daycare.

PSA-1000: Introduction to Human Sexuality (3 credits)

Description

This course is intended to interest students in the psychosexual development of the individual, addressing sexual function under the neurophysiological aspects, sensory and emotional and establish a parallel with his own attitudes in this area. He also improves his knowledge about sexual disorders.

PSA-1006: Families and Sexual Abuse: Intervention (3 credits)

Description

This course is divided into three themes: family of young sex offenders; Family of adult sex offender; Family victims of sexual abuse. For each component, it deals with the assessment and the various treatment modalities offered to this clientele.

PSA-2002: adult sexual delinquency (3 credits)

Description

This course presents the main paraphilias: homosexual pedophilia, heterosexual pedophilia, incest, exhibitionism, rape. Are discussed the various theories (biological, psychoanalytical, behavioral, social), the etiologic factors involved as well as the different treatment modalities, an aspect of the prevention of recidivism and mechanisms of the judicial system ratachent it.

PSA-2003: Juvenile Delinquency sex (3 credits)

Description

This course deals with sexual behavior problems among young people. The first part focuses on the theoretical aspects of juvenile sexual offending. The second part deals with the evaluation process and legal aspects. Finally, the third part deals with various treatment programs as well as treatment modalities.

PSA-2004: Sexual Abuse Victims (3 credits)

Description

This course presents the situation of victims of sexual abuse: the incidence, the types of sexual abuse, types of victims, the secondary psychopathological aspects as well as the short and long term consequences. Are also described the process of evaluation and expertise (psychosexual, Forensic and sexolégale), the various treatment modalities, mechanisms of the judicial system concerned, as well as aspects of prevention and services offered by the various resources of Remarks and notions such as false allegations and selective memory.

PSA-2005: Sexual assault and Law (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to familiarize the student with the criminal judicial process regarding sexual crimes. The student will be able to increase his understanding of the judicial events, determine the stages of a trial and to recognize the rules of law to understand the decisions made.

RLT-1000: Industrial Relations Foundations (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to present an overview of the industrial relations field and the various aspects under which it can be studied. After a study of the nature of industrial relations and their development, exposed that the system by means of labor relations with all its components. In addition, this course presents the main sources of citation in industrial relations.

RLT-1001: Unionism (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to bring the student to grasp the complex phenomenon of the union, to take him to a systematic reflection on the nature of trade unionism, its modes and levels of action and the questions that unionism must answer. It presents the concepts and terminology applicable to this area, examines the evolution of the labor movement and discusses topics related to the labor movement today, while establishing some international comparisons.

RLT-1003: Work and Organizational Structure (3 credits)

Description

By using mainly sociology, this course introduces students to the basic concepts related to work and organizations. It presents theoretical approaches and empirical knowledge about the evolution of work and functioning of the organizations and the relationship between the person and his work. It emphasizes the social relations at work and in organizations, by focusing particularly on the employment relationship, the power relations and actors games. It also addresses the structural dimension of work and organizations by studying the various forms they experienced, including the Taylorism and bureaucracy, not to mention the impact of technological change on these forms of organization. Finally, it describes the effects of certain working conditions on the well-being and health of people who experience them.

RLT-1005: Labour Law I (3 credits)

Description

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the basic legal aspects of the work which does not concern the organization of collective labor relations. The studied topics are the introduction to the law, the constitutional division, the individual contract of employment and the state labor regulations.

RLT-1006: Human Resource Management Practices (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to identify and describe the main human resource management practices, as well as the structural environment that supports them. Specifically, this course aims to give an overview of the main features of structuring a management human resources, workforce planning, staffing, evaluation of performance, training and remuneration.

RLT-2000: Labour Law II (3 credits)

Description

The collective labor relations. I: general scheme. Qualification of the parties. Measures to protect freedom of association. Description of bargaining units. Application for certification. Powers and duties of the agencies. Conciliation, mediation, arbitration of disputes, strike, lockout, collective agreement, arbitration of grievances. Criminal complaints. II: emergency regimes: notions, techniques, mechanisms.

RLT-2002: Health and Safety (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the main concepts of health and safety at work, the main intervention approaches, including the ergonomic approach, and situate these concepts and approaches in relation to other human resources management approaches and within the overall framework of labor relations.

SAC-1001: Haitian Health System (3 credits)

Description

Structured course in the form of self-learning modules not only requiring class attendance. Study of the Haitian health system in an analytical and critical perspective. Concept of “health system” and organization of health systems in many countries. Evolution of the Haitian health system, from 1804 to the present. Structure, operation and issues of the Haitian health system.

SCR-2104: Psychology of Religion (3 credits)

Description

Problem of the genesis of religion in human consciousness. Effect of religion on mental functioning. Effect of psychological dynamics of religious representations. The idea of “projection” and “illusion” of desire concerning religion in the analysis of Freud. Using the experience in the genesis of religion point of view of Jung and James Maslow. Dialectic of experience and desire in the religious function.

SCR-2200: Intervene with the dying (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to better intervene with those at end of life and their families: understand their reality in its complexity and uniqueness; develop attitudes and skills when assisting the existential questions about life, death and meaning are at stake; experiment with accompanying tools and proofreading experience; become familiar with the resources available. Topics included: palliative care, bereavement, intervention pluralistic context, stress prevention compassion.

SIO-1000: Systems and Information Technology (3 credits)

Description

This course is designed to prepare general managers of organizations to face the information technology and management information systems in their industries, to give them the essential tools to contribute to their development and control by providing appropriate references frames. It generally affects all aspects of information systems and infrastructure of information technology. Particular attention is paid to contemporary trends in the area of systems and information technology including: Internet use in business, the development of digital business and e-commerce, setting up systems strategic information, business systems implementation (ERP), deploying mechanisms ensuring information security, knowledge management and the use of decision support tools. The focus is, however, on business opportunities, successes and possible failures. This brings the student to cope with contemporary trends, thus preparing it to profit.

SOC-1002: Methods of empirical research (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the student to different methodologies of empirical research in sociology and scientific discussions that they can generate. The analysis of sociological empirical research showing extracts these different methodologies and discussions on their job or on their relevance form the core of the course.

SOC-1101: Introduction to Sociology of Law (3 credits)

Description

This course presents three main avenues of the sociology of law. The law is understood as a kind of indicator of companies with sociological theory as a basis for comparative studies with historical sociology as a particular social practice (structuring and structured) with sociology of contemporary societies.

SOC-2127: Social Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Social life as intersubjective phenomenon, from interpersonal relationships to the broader socio-historical phenomena. Society as the topic: how socialization makes us autonomous beings. The subject society: how our perceptions of the social environment guide our decision on the common world and its conflicts.

SVS-1102: Poverty and underdevelopment (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: acquire theoretical and empirical knowledge about the dual problem of poverty and development as well as the intervention in this matter. Content: the meaning and measurement of poverty; the prevalence and dynamics of poverty in Haiti and in the developed and developing; individual and collective consequences of poverty; public policy; different routes of social service intervention on poverty and development.

SVS-1106: Alcoholism, drug dependency and (3 credits)

Description

Objective: to know the realities, issues and dependencies on customers and addictions. Content: social representations of these phenomena, their individual and collective effects, prevention and diversity of interventions which they give rise. This course focuses more particularly the implications related to the practice of psychosocial intervention.

SVS-1108: Intervention Field: Gerontology (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: knowledge of the problems of old age; fitness for aid intervention with the elderly. Content: gerontology. The aging phenomenon as a biological, psychological and sociological. Protection. Home support. Institutionalization. Mental Health. Autonomy. Problems of identity and belonging.

SVS-1110: Field of intervention: childhood and adolescence (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce the student to the attention of social services for children and youth. Content: historical perspective; legal, organization of the network of social services for children and youth; theoretical models; Main problems faced by children and adolescents and actions attached to it in social work.

SVS-1121: New realities of social practice (3 credits)

Description

The contemporary social service this interdisciplinary interfaces. This situation leads social workers to deal with new fields of intervention that control, in turn, new intervention practices. This course aims to explore the relationship between three existing areas of intervention of the social worker: the field of criminal justice, the field of intervention for Aboriginal and finally, the field of victimology. The course aims to deepen both theoretical knowledge and practical interventions to improve student in these areas.

TXM-1002: Theories of addiction and models (3 credits)

Description

This course aims comprehensive review of all etiologic models addiction. It addresses the disease model, prohibition, models: moral, behavioral, cognitive, biopsychosocial, genetics and many others. In addition to a description of these models, a critical analysis of past and current theories is presented. Finally, this course offers study and highlight the beliefs of the student to tackle drug abuse and drug addicts.

TXM-2404: Street work, street drugs, street gangs (3 credits)

Description

This course consists of three components related to outreach. It aims to enable students to acquire the basic knowledge and skills required to carry out preventive interventions to consumers in the context of the street. It focuses on the different models of practice, forms of intervention (present-field reference, accompaniment, follow-up) and their characteristics. It describes psychoactive substances consumed in the context of street and addresses the dimensions of the phenomenon of street gangs against work intervention strategies of proximity.

The BTC-1000 course, GSF-1020, MNG-1000, MNG-1001 RK-1000 RK-2102 and SIO-1000 are also available in English: BTC-1106, GSF-1025, MNG-1002, MNG- 1103, MRK-1101, MRK 2110 and SIO-1101.

Preparatory training to higher education in other areas; During part of the additional block. Admission to these other programs is not assured by registering for these courses: the student must check the direction of the Master’s program concerned.


Business Administration (M.B.A.)

GSE-1000 and MNG-1001

Public affairs

POL-1006 and 2202-POL

Anthropology

ANT-1002 ANT-1004 (or ANT-1700), ANT-2000 ANT-2001 ANT-3003

Communication

COM-1000 COM-1051 COM-2000 COM-2150 and during 1004 from COM-COM-2300 or COM-2400

Counseling and Guidance

CSO-1002 (or CSO-1200), CSO-1007, CSO, 1009 CSO-2000-CSO 2201, CSO-2203 RAM-3900, SRM-3901 and YSP-1108 (or PSY-1107)

Speech Therapy

LNG LNG-1002 and-1003

Industrial Relations

ECN-2902, RLT-1000, RLT-1001, RLT-1006 and RLT-2000. The student who also want the opportunity to choose two other courses: ECN-1902, RLT-1003, RLT-1005 or RLT-2002

Administrative Sciences – Analytical Marketing (. M. Sc)

RK-1000 and RK-2102

Undergraduate students in psychology are exempt from the prerequisites (if any) for courses that are part of these gateways. Contact your program management to proceed with registration.

The student admitted to the entrepreneurial profile should follow the ENT-1000 course, ENT-3000 ENT-3010 and during 2108 among MNG-MNG-4144, MNG-MNG-4145 or 4146. See the program management to make the necessary adjustments.

REQUIREMENTS 3-21 CREDITS AMONG 30 TO

MAT-2902: Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To know and apply the descriptive and inferential statistical techniques commonly used in psychology. Content: Analysis of variance in factorial design, testing various statistical indices ordinal or categorical data for tests (X2, binomial, Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, Wilcoxon, rs Spearman, and Kendall Tau W).

PSY-1100: Foundations of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic (3 credits)

Description

This course presents the basic concepts of psychodynamic and psychoanalytic perspective in psychology. It focuses on the earlier work to Freud, Freudian psychoanalysis, the School of object relations and its development (Klein, Mahler, Kernberg), and current conceptions of mental functioning, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy dynamics as they are influenced by neuropsychoanalysis, socio-affective neuropsychology and psychology of contemporary development.

PSY-1101: Foundations of behavioral and cognitive approach (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To familiarize students with behavioral and cognitive approach. Content: theoretical bases; critical review and practical knowledge of the main behaviorales-cognitive methods used in the treatment of specific issues; measures the change; Main research trends; applications in different environments and different situations; ethical issues.

PSY-1102: Psychology of Motivation (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To acquire basic knowledge of human motivation. Content: theoretical approaches to psychology of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation; Empirical studies of certain phenomena such as competition, school dropout, procrastination, marital happiness, conflict, prevention and difficulty following a diet.

PSY-1103: gerontology Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce the student to some great themes of gerontological psychology; describe the psychological changes associated with advancing age; stimulate critical thinking. Content: attitudes towards the elderly, welfare, sensory processes, intelligence, memory, personality, transitions of old age, certain medical aspects such as depression, suicide and organic brain syndromes.

PSY-1104: Family Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: understanding in a biopsychosocial perspective, systemic and integrative, the dynamics of the couple and of the family, whatever its form. Contents: new forms of parenthood, dysfonctionnalités the couple and the family. Stages of the cycle of family life, family pathologies events (family secrets, abuse, etc.), therapeutic power of the family, family therapy and family mediation.

PSY-1105: Prevention (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: master the concepts of the preventive approach in mental health; know and analyze promotional and preventive interventions. Content: theoretical models, risk and protective factors, implementation and evaluation of programs for children, adolescents, adults and the community.

PSY-1106: Health Psychology (3 credits)

Description

Objective: Introduction to health psychology and awareness of the interaction between psychological and biological systems. Content: theoretical and conceptual models depicting the psychological-biological relationship (eg. Stress, adaptation and disease). Role of psychological and behavioral factors in predisposition, development, adaptation and management of somatic diseases.

PSY-1108: Basic Interpersonal skills (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: acquire basic skills in interpersonal and communication psychotherapy context; develop the analysis of inferential processes involved during an interaction; become familiar with the specific relational issues in different walks of life and intervention. Content: the working alliance as an active agent of change, the basic relational attitudes (empathy, respect, neutrality, etc.), active listening, reformulation, the open and closed questions, self-disclosure, reflect emotions, confrontation, interpretation, immediacy, management of ambivalence and problem solving.

PSY-2100: behavioral Behavior Analysis (3 credits)

Description

Objective: to learn the student the basic knowledge to analyze, understand and discuss various psychological phenomena. Content: observation techniques and functional analysis of human behavior will be discussed and illustrated by numerous examples from various fields of applied psychology.

PSY-210: Practical work (3 credits)

Description

This course has the overall goal to enable students to live an experience of contact with people monitoring generally considered marginal or with disabilities or who have difficulty in terms of mental health. A better familiarization with the social determinants of the problems as well as the strengths of people and intervention settings is also covered.

PSY-2104: Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the field of clinical neuropsychology. Topics include neuroanatomy, neurological disorders, principles of asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres, cognitive disorders associated with frontal lesions, temporal and parietal, memory, language, neuropsychological assessment and functional rehabilitation.

PSY-2105: Social-emotional development of 0-12 (3 credits)

Description

Objective: to know in detail the steps and important concepts of social emotional development of the child. Content: individual differences, emotions, the role of attachment, family educational context, the Self, the role of peer aggression.

PSY-2106: Intervention and understanding of pathological gambling (3 credits)

Description

This course outlines the elements, risk factors and processes inherent in the development of the problem of compulsive gambling. It addresses the detection and evaluation of pathological gambling and explores the different etiologic theories. Of particular lingers in the cognitive-behavioral explanations. The various treatments on offer to players are explored Finally, different intervention strategies, including cognitive restructuring, are discussed and practiced.

PSY-2107: Developmental Psycholinguistics (3 credits)

Description

Study stages, aspects and theories of language acquisition. The pre-linguistic skills, the course of the semantic and syntactic development, pragmatic and discursive aspects of language, metalinguistic skills. Etiology of individual differences, language disorders, measuring language skills and gender differences. Links between language and cognition, language and reading, language and behavior.

PSY-2109: Sleep and Dreams (3 credits)

Description

The first part of the course is devoted to study methods, stadiums and postures, psychophysiological and neurophysiological bases of sleep. The second part affects alertness and sleep disorders, and comorbidity of certain mental disorders with them. Finally, the course deals with dreams, their functions and the various theories concerning them.

PSY 2110: Psychology of addictions (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: to describe, explain and understand the theoretical and practical dependencies in the light of theories and basic models in this area. Of particular lingers béhaviorales-cognitive explanations. It addresses the dependencies with and without substances with emphasis on the latter. Content: alcoholism, drug addiction, pathological gambling, Internet addiction, addictive sexuality, compulsive shopping, video games and smoking.

PSY-2111: Suicide Psychology (3 credits)

Description

This course helps to better understand the problem of suicide from different theoretical concepts of suicidal behavior. It also allows clients to recognize risk, to grasp the underlying dynamics at various state and assess suicidal suicidal danger. It explains the procedures for intervention with suicidal clients and problems specific to certain client. It also proposes the use of different clinical strategies.

PSY-2113: Psychology and Cultures (3 credits)

Description

Student’s introduction to the relationship between psychology and complex cultures. Introduction to cultural psychology in all its forms: contemporary and older, comparative, clinic or on the contact of cultures. Awareness of socio-cultural diversity and its importance in the understanding of human behavior, but also the consideration of diversity in psychological interventions.

PSY-2114: Psychology and Evolution (3 credits)

Description

Relevance of the theory of evolution in psychology. Evolutionary and comparative approach of social organization and social behavior; ontogenetic development; learning, cognition and intelligence; social learning, traditions and culture; functions of emotions. Applications of evolutionary approach in personality psychology and psychopathology.

PSY-2115: Cyberpsychology (3 credits)

Description

This course examines human behavior in cyberspace (Internet, social media and virtual spaces) from a psychological point of view. The first part focuses on the psychological processes involved in the use of digital technologies in the individual and groups. The second part examines the impact of the use of cyberspace on human behavior and mental health, as well as in practice and psychological research.

PSY-2116: Child’s Cognitive Development (3 credits)

Description

This course provides a general picture of the cognitive development of children from birth to adolescence. It discusses the stages of cognitive development through the major theoretical perspectives and addresses the development of specific cognitive skills, atypical cognitive development (eg. Neurodevelopmental Disorders) and various risk factors and protection may be involved in the development cognitive.

PSY-3150: Directed Research I (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PSY-3151: Directed Research II (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PSY-3152: Psychology Applied to employment (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: integrating psychology students on the labor market and encourage practical training in the workplace. Content: targeting the labor market, writing a curriculum vitae (CV) and a cover letter, the art of a successful job interview and the development of professional skills related to the job held. This course refers to employment credited career-oriented. From the beginning of the course, the student must have agreed with his employer of activities planned during use, their valuation methods and issues related to them.

PSY-3154: Advanced Psychopathology (3 credits)

Description

History and contemporary approaches in the study of mental health disorders and life adjustment problems. Exploration of some forms of psychopathology in children, adolescents, adults, couples, families and the elderly in light of the scientific literature and various contemporary theoretical models in clinical psychology. Cultural and ethnic factors in psychopathology. Presentation and critical assessment of mental disorders classification systems (DSM-IV-TR and others).

PSY-3155: Clinical Psychopharmacology (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to provide students with extra knowledge about psychotropic drugs and nootropics used in clinical settings for the treatment of affective disorders, behavioral and cognitive. Revision of general principles of psychopharmacology. Description of the main psychotropic drugs and nootropics used in clinical psychopharmacology (such as antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, stimulants, agents stimulating / enhancing cognitive function), their indications, risks and side effects.

RESEARCH AND INVENTION 18 CREDITS

MAT-2902: Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To know and apply the descriptive and inferential statistical techniques commonly used in psychology. Content: Analysis of variance in factorial design, testing various statistical indices ordinal or categorical data for tests (X2, binomial, Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, Wilcoxon, rs Spearman, and Kendall Tau W).

PSY-1108: Basic Interpersonal skills (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: acquire basic skills in interpersonal and communication psychotherapy context; develop the analysis of inferential processes involved during an interaction; become familiar with the specific relational issues in different walks of life and intervention. Content: the working alliance as an active agent of change, the basic relational attitudes (empathy, respect, neutrality, etc.), active listening, reformulation, the open and closed questions, self-disclosure, reflect emotions, confrontation, interpretation, immediacy, management of ambivalence and problem solving.

PSY-3150: Directed Research I (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PSY-3151: Directed Research II (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PSY-3154: Advanced Psychopathology (3 credits)

Description

History and contemporary approaches in the study of mental health disorders and life adjustment problems. Exploration of some forms of psychopathology in children, adolescents, adults, couples, families and the elderly in light of the scientific literature and various contemporary theoretical models in clinical psychology. Cultural and ethnic factors in psychopathology. Presentation and critical assessment of mental disorders classification systems (DSM-IV-TR and others).

PSY-3155: Clinical Psychopharmacology (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to provide students with extra knowledge about psychotropic drugs and nootropics used in clinical settings for the treatment of affective disorders, behavioral and cognitive. Revision of general principles of psychopharmacology. Description of the main psychotropic drugs and nootropics used in clinical psychopharmacology (such as antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, stimulants, agents stimulating / enhancing cognitive function), their indications, risks and side effects.

9 SEARCH CREDITS

MAT-2902: Quantitative Methods II (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To know and apply the descriptive and inferential statistical techniques commonly used in psychology. Content: Analysis of variance in factorial design, testing various statistical indices ordinal or categorical data for tests (X2, binomial, Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, Wilcoxon, rs Spearman, and Kendall Tau W).

PSY-3150: Directed Research I (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PSY-3151: Directed Research II (3 credits)

Description

Production, in teams of two students, a research under the supervision of a teacher. The course allows the application of skills already acquired and the acquisition of new knowledge related to the execution of a search.

PROFILES OF STUDY

Distinction Profile

The profile distinction is a journey of 12 credits to accelerate the transition to control with or without memory. It provides the ability to track up to 12 credits of graduate, contributory to both the bachelor and master. The student is invited to meet the directions of the first programs and graduate to find access to the profile requirements and, if necessary, to validate the content.

The student should have acquired two thirds of the program credits and have an average program of equal or greater to 4.1 / 4.33. [/su_note]

RULE 1-12 CREDITS

The profile is satisfied with the success of the following: (customize).

Entrepreneurial profile

ENT-1000: Know undertake: the passion to create and act (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course in entrepreneurship is for any student in the first cycle. It aims to develop a sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in students, to help them discover and exploit its full entrepreneurial potential. The knowledge imparted to students relate to both the entrepreneur and the creative process by which he leads his project to fruition, be it a social project, commercial, cooperative, artistic or otherwise. Concrete examples are given to illustrate the passion of entrepreneurs, their need to create and innovate and action orientation. Available in class or distance, the course plays a key role in the development of entrepreneurial skills. The course includes the realization of an entrepreneurial sketch to sensitize the students to the realities of an entrepreneurial project and develop a more just vision of the challenges to be considered. The sketch is not a comprehensive business plan, the progress of the course remains primarily the discovery and development of the entrepreneurial potential of the student and not the creation of a company.

ENT-3000: Entrepreneurial Portfolio I (3 credits)

Description

The student must be admitted to the entrepreneurial profile, Certificate in Entrepreneurship and SME management or firmware developing entrepreneurial skills and detain or above average 2.67 calculated on 24 credits or more in a program to register in this activity. The entrepreneurial portfolio allows students to develop a project related to their field of study, to establish a network of contacts and thus improve their entrepreneurial skills. Personalized support is provided by frequent meetings with a counselor Entrepreneurship throughout the project development period. Coaching facilitates the process by allowing the student to validate and deepen their project idea, to focus its efforts and develop its action plan.

ENT-3010: Entrepreneurial Portfolio II (3 credits)

Description

The student must be admitted to the entrepreneurial profile, Certificate in Entrepreneurship and SME management or firmware developing entrepreneurial skills and detain or above average 2.67 calculated on 24 credits or more in a program to register in this activity. The entrepreneurial portfolio allows students to develop a project related to their field of study, to establish a network of contacts and thus improve their entrepreneurial skills. Personalized support is provided by frequent meetings with a counselor Entrepreneurship throughout the project development period. Coaching facilitates the process by allowing the student to validate and deepen their project idea, to focus its efforts and develop its action plan.

RULE 1-3 AMONG CREDITS

MNG-2108: Achieving its entrepreneurial project (3 credits)

Description

This distance learning course is for anyone interested in a real or simulated process of making a commercial project, social, cooperative, artistic or otherwise, and who wishes to establish his own record company for the realization of his project. The concepts acquired in this course allow everyone to increase their general knowledge in the field of entrepreneurship, but especially to analyze the elements necessary for the realization of a business plan to fully determine the needs related to their project and the specific constraints on startup.

MNG-4144: Transmission and business succession (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the various aspects of the business transfer or the transfer of management and the transfer of ownership, taking into account the various actors involved in the process. Although an important place is given to the transmission of family business, the course also covers internal transmission (by employees) and external (redemption). This undergraduate course is for the person who works in a family business or aspiring to do so, and anyone who wishes to transfer his enterprise, acquire or take over. It is also of interest to the person wishing to eventually act as counsel to the parties concerned by the transfer of a business, including the seller and the buyer.

MNG-4145: Self-employment and micro-enterprise (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to present the realities of the entrepreneur who operates as a self-employed and in the context of micro-enterprise (less than five people). The participant is required to study the benefits, obligations, responsibilities, resources and proper management practices for this type of career and activities.

MNG-4146: Group Entrepreneurship: social and cooperative (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to familiarize the participant to the specific context of cooperative and non-profit organizations in the context of an entrepreneurial approach. The course caters for the person looking for an alternative to traditional entrepreneurship or who wants to respond associatively to a common problem.

INTERNATIONAL PROFILE

EHE-1PSY: Studies – International profile – Bachelor of Psychology (12 to 18 credits)

Description

Activities carried out in a university abroad, under international profile, which will be equivalencies student record upon presentation of the official transcript of the activities.
Course Information
  • Course Id:PSY
Instructors