School of Social Services

Social Services School

Baccalaureate (BA) in Social Service (BSW)

OBJECTIVE

The courses in this program are divided into four groups. The theme “Social services, occupation and social policies” will introduce you to the different theoretical elements related to social policies, social institutions and the exercise of the profession of social work in different practice areas. “Methodology and practice of social service” will introduce you to the theoretical elements, practical and methodological critical to social work practice while “Searching” will introduce you to research in social work, including applied research to intervention. Finally, with the theme “Individual and Society”, you will follow extracurricular courses through which you gain knowledge about human behavior and the social environment. Throughout your studies, you will be taught the fundamental links between social policy, social services and the social problems in a systemic and sociopolitical perspective.

Ability

Good in listening skills and advising people to help them solve their problems. Have a social conscience and sense of responsibility. Be a balanced person, confident and unselfish. Mastering human relations and communication. Having the ability to resolve conflicts and to reconcile the parties.

Opportunity

As a social worker you undertake to promote social change, problem solving in human relationships. You also prônerez individual rights and social development for a more just and equitable society.

Professions

Intervention and Awareness Programs Development Officer

Community Life Development Officer

Human relations officer

Animator

Coordinator-speaker

Speaker (youth, community or social, mental health, psychosocial and addiction)

Intervening in Crisis

Community Organizer

Host Organizations Responsible

Social Worker

Employers

Nursing homes and long-term care

Rehabilitation centers

Health centers and social services

General and specialized hospitals

Youth Centers

Local Development Centers

Regional development cooperatives

Private companies and firms

Ministries and public and parapublic organizations

Community Organizations


FURTHER STUDIES GRADUATE

Bachelor’s Degree – This leads to graduate studies in social work.

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION

All requirements must be met when undertaking the program.

The applicant must meet the following requirements:

Be 18 years or older.

Hold a high school diploma (Bac II) or its equivalent

Having left school early.

Applicants presenting a combination of education and relevant experience deemed equivalent to that required of the holder applicant may be eligible as a result of the analysis of the file.

The program is limited enrollment, the number of places is very limited.

Selection criteria

The application is analyzed on the basis of the quality of academic record.

Laptop Computer

In undertaking its program, the student must acquire, from the first session, a portable computer equipped with a number of software, allowing the applicant to undertake the course of his research. Proficiency in basic computer functions and common software is essential. Introductory courses to specialized software are offered outside the program.

Knowledge of French

Students admitted to the ESS must comply with the provisions relating to the implementation of the policy on the use of French at the University GOC

Non-francophone candidates

Candidates whose language of instruction in primary and secondary education is not the French must demonstrate a minimum level of knowledge of the French language. His skills in written French will be assessed on arrival and, where applicable, a patch French courses could be added to its journey.

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

Bachelor (Licence) in Social Service (B. SERV. SOC.)

*This page presents the official version of the program. The University G.O.C. reserves the right to change the content without notice.

EHE – Studies Off-Campus

EHE1SVS                Studies – International Profile – Bachelor of Social Work

EHE6SVS                Studies – International Profile – Masters In Social Work

SVS – Social Service

SVS1000                Sociopolitical Foundations of Social Work

SVS1004                Introduction To Research in Social Work

SVS1005                Introduction To Social Work

SVS1700                Basic Concepts in Social Work

SVS2000                Process of Intervention: Individual and Family Social Service I

SVS2001                Process of Intervention in Social Work Of Groups I

SVS2003                Process Of Intervention: Social Service Personal and Family II

SVS2004                Process of Intervention: Social Service Groups II

SVS3100                Process of Intervention: Social Service Personal and Family III

SVS3101                Process of Intervention: Social Group III

SVS4005                Feminist Theories and Social Service

SVS6001                Special Topics (Social Work)

SVS6011                Special Topics (Social Work)

SVS6012                Special Topics (Social Work)

SVS6016                Introduction To Social Work

SVS7012                Contemporary Paradigms in Social Work

SVS7014                Advanced Practices Social Service Staff

SVS7016                Advanced Social Group Practices

SVS8003                Special Topics (Social Work)

SVS8004                Special Topics (Social Work)

(93 credits)

Social Work

SVS-1000: Socio-Political Foundations of Social Work (3 Credits)

Description

This course summarizes, in a critical analysis, key basic theoretical elements borrowed from sociology and political science that have most influenced the social service. Are thus faced with the practice of social service concepts such as these: social structures, constraints, roles, status, functions; culture, values, norms, patterns, symbols and ideologies; institutions, organizations, systems; social change. The course is addressed in terms of values of social justice and social change in the tradition of the anti oppressive perspective of social service.

SVS-1005: Introduction to Social Work (3 Credits)

Description

Acquire knowledge of the contemporary social pattern and the characteristics of its practice. Explain the specific nature of the goals, different designs and components of social service and the basics of ethics and professional system. Rollover the different realities of the potential clients of the social service and the problems they experience through community visits. Identify the skills and basic attitudes necessary for the practice of the profession and initiate a reflection in order to confirm or strengthen the professional choice.

SVS-1006: Policies, programs and services in the social field (3 Credits)

Description

Understand the concepts and issues that underlie and determine the debates and changes in political, social programs and services; examine more precisely how they apply to the Haitian situation grasp and understand the current organization and management mechanisms agencies offering social services in Haiti; design, in this context, the main strengths and limitations of these policies, programs and services; examine various scenarios to meet the current challenges.

SVS-1007: mental health and social functioning (3 Credits)

Description

Know and understand the legal and organizational context within which social services are provided in the field of mental health. Know the new guidelines to apply in assessing the social functioning of people with a mental or neurological disorder. Deepening recovery concepts in mental health. Embed the understanding of social functioning of people with a mental disorder with conceptual models that focus on the interactions between the individual and its environment. Understanding the contribution of families in restoring them. Describe and explain certain mental and personality.

SVS-1004: Introduction to Research in Social Work (3 Credits)

Description

The overall objective of the course is to teach the student to document, scientifically, an issue to support the intervention in social work. The course provides an understanding of the diversity of social work research practices, to develop skills in the use and critique of research and find helpful methods and research techniques in professional practice social service.

SVS-2000: Intervention Process: personal and family social service I (3 Credits)

Description

Objectives: to provide a conceptual framework, methodological and experiential for the application of the intervention process (basic principles of intervention in social service staff) and allow the acquisition of general knowledge on the methodology of intervention and the development of ‘practical skills.

SVS-2001: Social Work Intervention Process Group I (3 Credits)

Description

This course aims to define the social group as a method of intervention and to promote understanding of the phenomenon of small groups by providing theoretical and illustrating it with practical examples.

SVS-2002: Intervention Process: CBO I (3 Credits)

Description

The course aims to introduce students to the theoretical foundations of community organization, the concepts related to it and to its history and its intervention process. It also discusses, in detail, the first step of this process, or the knowledge of a community.

SVS-1008: Ethics and Conduct (3 Credits)

Description

Objective: acquire theoretical and practical knowledge of ethics in order to analyze the process of ethical decision making in the practice of social service. Content: basic ethical issues in contemporary social service. Ethical dilemmas in services to individuals and families in planning and social policy and in relations between practitioners. Using a code of ethics of social service.

SVS-2003: Intervention Process: personal and family social service II (3 Credits)

Description

Objective: To become familiar with the theoretical basis of intervention with individuals and families and with different models of intervention, plan and implement interventions, and develop relevant strategies according to different objectives.

SVS-2004: Intervention Process: social service groups II (3 Credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to become familiar with the various components of the planning and implementation of group intervention and intervention strategies needed to practice.

SVS-2005: Intervention Process: CBO II (3 Credits)

Description

Objectives: introduce students to social intervention with communities; understand the general process of intervention in community organization; know the different skills and competencies required in the intervention process.

SVS-2500: Stage I (9 Credits)

Description

The objective of this course is acquiring a core competency in the practice of intervention. The focus is on immersion in the professional environment and the advancement of knowledge of the environment.

SVS-3500: Internship II (9 Credits)

Description

This course aims to give a more detailed response training: developing professional skills, assume responsibilities in work, strengthen the initiative, autonomy and professional identity.

FIS-4101: Interprofessional person-centered one (1 credit)

Description

This interfaculty course focuses on the theoretical and conceptual foundations related to interprofessional person-centered. The essential elements in the implementation of these foundations in different health contexts in professional practice are discussed.

FIS-4102: Interprofessional person-centered 2 (1 credit)

Description

This course covers interfaculty team work as a form of collaboration. The success of collaboration depends on the way the team is formed, develops and interaction among its members. Understanding of group processes is essential to develop interprofessional collaboration skills.

FIS-4103: Interprofessional person centered 3 (1 credit)

Description

This course covers interfacultaire interprofessional collaboration, which in the health system, takes different forms in different practice settings. Collaboration is conditioned by various factors that are discussed in this course. An understanding of current interprofessional practices coupled with a critical gaze on them facilitate learning interprofessional collaboration.

SVS-3000: Applied research to intervention (3 credits)

Description

The main objective of the course is to equip the student with real issues from the internship experience, so that it develops assessment and intervention strategies that adapts research tools to the context of intervention. In particular, the student must be able to demonstrate its ability to use existing tools or create for the purposes of his intervention. This assumes control of collection techniques and data analysis. Methodological choices for preferred orientations by the student in his analysis and evaluation. The course content provides, among others, on the evaluation of the intervention strategies and research techniques used in a valuation perspective.

SVS-3001: Integration Seminar (3 credits)

Description

Centered on the experience and internships in conjunction with these, the integration seminar offers the students various learning formulas for the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge (individualized instruction, seminar, case studies, practical work) . It aims to develop the attitudes, skills and continuous professional skills such as the acquisition of a reflective and critical capacity in relation to its practice.

SVS-3002: Analysis of social problems (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: to acquire knowledge and develop skills that will serve as theoretical and methodological support in the study of social problems, the object of the intervention in social work; acquire social contextualization capacity of the observed problems and integrate this contextualization its interventions. Contents: the concept of the social problem; the main theoretical approaches; the analysis of current social issues.

SVS-3100: Intervention Process: personal and family social service III (3 credits)

Description

From a pre-placement and a return on this practice, this course aims at a better integration of theory and practice and the more knowledge staff development social service.

SVS-3101: Intervention Process: social group III (3 credits)

Description

From a pre-placement and a return on this practice, this course aims at a better integration of theory and practice in social group work as well as the deepening of specific themes that have not been addressed in previous courses.

SVS-3102: Intervention Process: CBO III (3 credits)

Description

This course will prepare the student in the first course, to help identify and solve problems, to transmit new knowledge and, finally, to provide it with tools to analyze the practices of community organization.

REQUIREMENTS SPECIFIC PROGRAM

REQUIREMENT 1-0 3 CREDITS TO

Pass the course ANL-2020 Intermediate English II. The student who demonstrates that he has acquired this level (TOEIC: 675) during the test administered by the School of Languages can choose a course in Regulation 2 of the program. [/su_note]

REQUIREMENT 2-6 TO 9 AMONG CREDITS

ADS-1909: Sex Education, family and school (3 credits)

Description

Relations between family and school; controversies and debates about the role of each in sex education. View of sexuality in an analysis of different forms of family and school organization. The needs of youth sexuality. Tolerance and intolerance facing the adult sexual experience demonstrations of young people. Parent training in sex education.

ANT-1002: Survey Methodology and Ethnography (3 credits)

Description

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic anthropological research techniques in their theoretical and practical aspects, and the process of research: ethnography, reading files, desk research, field research ; ethical and practical research; Working enforcement techniques.

ANT-1005: Anthropology families and relatives of current (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the new family forms from an anthropological perspective. After affiliation of international adoption or assisted reproduction, created alliances through marriages arranged remotely proliferation of blended families, single parents or same-sex, all these apparently new forms of “doing family” went under the microscope of knowledge Ethnographic to examine the continuity and rupture elements that underlie them.

ANT-1304: Sexualities and Cultures (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to better understand how sex and gender are social and cultural constructions. To achieve this, it illustrates the cultural and historical diversity of sexual practices and discourses on sexuality and gender. In doing so, the course raises a critical distance from the as sexuality conceived in the West and explores the close ties between practices, sexual discourse and political and economic issues.

ANT-1902: International Experience and culture shock (3 credits)

Description

This course covers the cultural shock from a global perspective. It deals with social, political and historical in which the shock occurs and explores the strategies developed by people who have experienced such a shock. Starting from real situations, it suggests ways to meet each other.

ANT-2304: Anthropology and Development (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological approaches to development and its multiple dimensions examined in terms of globalization, modernity, and links between the “local” and “global”. Specificity of the anthropological approach, both in terms of issues than on methods. Thematic debates.

ANT-2307: Contemporary Aboriginal Issues (3 credits)

Description

The course aims to analyze the main contemporary topical issues relating to indigenous peoples. The focus is on Aboriginal claims and political struggles, the assertion places and appropriation, as well as social and political issues of the communities. Then, this course takes as its starting point the status of Native Americans to treat the condition and aspirations of indigenous peoples of the world, both from a comparative point of view and from the perspective of the claims and joint mobilizations On the international scene.

COM-2300: Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to basic knowledge required to perform communication strategies: knowledge of the organization, environment, psychology of the individual, public opinion, media and communication techniques. Research tools to acquire each of these knowledge. Procedures for evaluation of the strategies adopted. Public relations as architect of the image of the company (public or private) and its realities management tool.

CRI-1000: History of knowledge in criminology (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the student to the constituent elements of a pre-scientific thought and moral giving birth, in the eighteenth century, the theories of the classical school on crime and punishment. Birth statistics and put in connection with the rise of the scientific era in the nineteenth century, generates a criminology at scientific claim.

CSO-1100: Identity and self-concept (3 credits)

Description

Study the processes by which the individual is characterized, is different. The identity, training, integrating role in the psychological development. Self-concept, its formal properties. Knowledge of main models in developmental psychology of identity.

DDU-1000: Foundations for Sustainable Development (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course to sustainable development is for all undergraduate student. It is to provide an introduction to the concept of different sizes and the implementation of sustainable development tools. It allows the student to acquire the basic elements of a general reflection on sustainable development, which takes into account its many ambiguities and difficulties in its operationalization. In addition, this course encourages thinking about the tools necessary for his apprehension as social project. This interdisciplinary course is delivered remotely to autumn sessions, winter and summer. This course is mandatory sustainability profile.

DRT-1710: The right of persons (3 credits)

Description

Legal personality and its attributes; disabilities; protection of persons incapable of mechanisms; Marriage: conditions of validity and penalties; effects in personal relationships between spouses; pecuniary relations between spouses: power of representation; protection of the family residence; matrimonial; donations marriage contract; biological and adoptive filiation; parental authority; violations of the marriage bond; the tax implications of marriage, the incidence of marriage with respect to social legislation; the legal aspects of the common law and the separation of fact.

DRT-1716: Employment Law (3 credits)

Description

The administrative organization in the field of health and social services. The rights and obligations of the holders and beneficiaries of health services and social services, in particular the right to the service. The implementation of the rights and remedies. Protection mechanisms specific to certain sectors: youth protection, protection of the mentally ill. The status, rights and obligations of medical professionals and social services.

ENT-1000: Know undertake: the passion to create and act (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course in entrepreneurship is for any student in the first cycle. It aims to develop a sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in students, to help them discover and exploit its full entrepreneurial potential. The knowledge imparted to students relate to both the entrepreneur and the creative process by which he leads his project to fruition, be it a social project, commercial, cooperative, artistic or otherwise. Concrete examples are given to illustrate the passion of entrepreneurs, their need to create and innovate and action orientation. Available in class or distance, the course plays a key role in the development of entrepreneurial skills. The course includes the realization of an entrepreneurial sketch to sensitize the students to the realities of an entrepreneurial project and develop a more just vision of the challenges to be considered. The sketch is not a comprehensive business plan, the progress of the course remains primarily the discovery and development of the entrepreneurial potential of the student and not the creation of a company.

GEF-2000: Feminist Summer School (3 credits)

Description

This intensive one-week training meets each year around a different theme, guests and specialists working in different fields and disciplines.

GGR-1005: Human Geography: population, environment, development (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of the relationship between human societies, their economic activities and geographical areas. The development, its manifestations and problems. The consequences on the environment. Environmental problems and their impact on the economy. Links between the different spatial scales (local, regional, national, international).

LP-1005: Basic Concepts in Palliative Care (3 credits)

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the main basic concepts related to the practice in palliative care from an interdisciplinary perspective.

HST-2402: History of Women in Haiti (3 credits)

Description

This course traces the specificity of historical and current path of the Haitian to today. It aims to provide a framework of information, reflection and analysis on the meaning of women’s history and feminist struggles and to highlight the known features of this story in the context of Haitian society.

HST-2456: Haiti Social History (3 credits)

Description

In light of the remarkable progress of social history field, this course presents the major changes experienced by Haiti in terms of social facts in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It focuses on transformations of social organization and development of social movements. It pays special attention to the family and lifestyle, particularly in urban areas.

MNG-1000: The company and its management (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the main activities of management in the operation of a business. Following the development of a systemic framework situating the role of managers and the decisions they make are successively discusses the purpose and business strategies, planning, organization, management, control and sharing. Readings and exercises are performed, as well as teamwork. The preferred self-learning formula is supported in class by greater supervision of teacher.

MNG-1001: Organizational Behavior (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to make students aware of the importance of human aspects in the management of organizations and to make them familiar with the basic concepts of organizational behavior such as perception, motivation, group processes, communication, power, leadership, organizational culture, organizational development, career planning, stress. The course takes a multidisciplinary perspective and highlights several levels of analysis, namely individual, group and organization.

PHI-1001: Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to philosophical reflection on the social and political reality confronting the major philosophers and the main currents of thought of the philosophical tradition.

PHI-1116: Philosophy of Nature (3 credits)

Description

Study of some conceptions of nature (especially those of Aristotle, Descartes and Whitehead) for passing the student to a more or less commonplace vision, naive or romantic nature, to design an informed, thoughtful depth and different realities directly or indirectly related to the idea of nature. Highlighting a few fundamental problems and some essential evidence. The question of interiority and purpose in nature; the phenomenon of consciousness; the time and motion; the opposition nature-culture; nature and ecology.

PHI-1900: Logical Principles (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to make known some of the tools of thought and above all to show how to use them to better arrange the existing knowledge or those under development. We learn to analyze a text or a point of view, to bring out the essential, defining the concepts involved, to distinguish and evaluate the arguments involved. Such training is proving an asset to profitably address any field of study. It also assists in drafting more precise and coherent texts. As this is a basic course requires no previous training in logic. It may be followed by people in any field, as well, of course, by those who are enrolled in a philosophy program.

PHI-1903: Ethics and Aging (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the ethical problems we sometimes have to deal in old age and the approach of death. With the help of concepts such as autonomy, beneficence, and justice the person, we will study different themes such as identity in Alzheimer’s disease, the moral problem of euthanasia, the criterion of age and justice in health care, etc.

POL-1001: Politics and Democracy in Haiti (3 credits)

Description

This course provides an understanding of the political institutions envisaged with a view to the historical, legal and sociological. It deals with the following themes: constitutional history, the Constitution and its interpretation by the courts, federalism, political parties, elections and referendums, the executive and the parliament.

POL-1003: Political Systems and companies worldwide (3 credits)

Description

By integrating historical, economic and sociological, this course introduces the student to the different types of regimes and political systems, their operation and the problems they face in their relationships with their environment.

POL-1005: Introduction to International Relations (3 credits)

Description

Study of the international system; historical formation and ideological foundations; types of systems and transformations; Contemporary system; conflict process; Cooperation Process; transnational forces; major topics of current international debates; diplomacy and foreign policy.

POL-1007: Political Forces (3 credits)

Description

This course has overall political forces, specifying the nature of each. It deals with the meaning and scope of their actions and interactions, by placing them in the social and political groups and ask for elements of an overall reflection on them.

POL-2000: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the methods of quantitative social science research. After an overview of the key concepts of quantitative analysis (including concepts of sample and population, variable and constant measurement level and data type), we are studying the different statistical techniques to describe a variable (univariate analysis), to identify the relationships between two or more variables (bivariate and multivariate analyzes) and to draw conclusions about the characteristics of a population from a sample of observation (inferential statistics). No advanced knowledge of mathematics is required to achieve the objectives of this course.

POL-2318: Violence, conflict and politics (3 credits)

Description

The notion of conflict. The types of conflicts and types of strategies adopted by social actors in conflict. Violence as a result of conflict and as a means used by actors in conflict. The consequences of violent conflict for the societies in which they occur and for organized social groups (states, parties, movements, etc.) engaged in it.

PSA-1000: Introduction to Human Sexuality (3 credits)

Description

This course is intended to interest students in the psychosexual development of the individual, addressing sexual function under the neurophysiological aspects, sensory and emotional and establish a parallel with his own attitudes in this area. He also improves his knowledge about sexual disorders.

PSA-2003: Juvenile Delinquency sex (3 credits)

Description

This course deals with sexual behavior problems among young people. The first part focuses on the theoretical aspects of juvenile sexual offending. The second part deals with the evaluation process and legal aspects. Finally, the third part deals with various treatment programs as well as treatment modalities.

PSY-1000: Child Development (3 credits)

Description

This course of development, from conception to the end of childhood. Given by a group of professors, the course discusses the current state of knowledge, issues, their scientific basis and key concepts of each of the main aspects of development of the physical, cognitive, emotional and social.

PSY-1004: Psychopathology (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To distinguish the main forms of psychological maladjustment in adults. Content: Theoretical models in psychopathology; etiology and clinical picture, according to research various psychopathologies. Examples of maladaptive case.

PSY-1101: Foundations of behavioral and cognitive approach (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To familiarize students with behavioral and cognitive approach. Content: theoretical bases; critical review and practical knowledge of the main behaviorales-cognitive methods used in the treatment of specific issues; measures the change; Main research trends; applications in different environments and different situations; ethical issues.

PSY-2106: Intervention and understanding of pathological gambling (3 credits)

Description

This course outlines the elements, risk factors and processes inherent in the development of the problem of compulsive gambling. It addresses the detection and evaluation of pathological gambling and explores the different etiologic theories. Of particular lingers in the cognitive-behavioral explanations. The various treatments on offer to players are explored. Finally, different intervention strategies, including cognitive restructuring, are discussed and practiced.

RLT-1002: Environment and functions of the organization (3 credits)

Description

This course familiarizes the student with organizational management and complexity of the discipline. Specifically, it leads him to understand the dynamic nature of the management process and the impact of environmental factors on their practice; to discover the links between the different functions of the organization and management of the four classical precepts (planning, organization, management, control); and distinguish the different schools of thought and different discourse in science management. Finally, it provides an overview of current issues and management challenges.

SCR-2200: Intervene with the dying (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to better intervene with those at end of life and their families: understand their reality in its complexity and uniqueness; develop attitudes and skills when assisting the existential questions about life, death and meaning are at stake; experiment with accompanying tools and proofreading experience; become familiar with the resources available. Topics included: palliative care, bereavement, intervention pluralistic context, stress prevention compassion.

SOC-1100: Stratification and social classes (3 credits)

Description

The purpose of the course is the study of theoretical approaches and current configurations of class and inequality: cultural approach (intra-familial socialization, lifestyles) Bourdieu; report classes and power; social mobility; poverty, social marginalization. Impact of globalization on inequality by the recomposition of the labor market and the welfare state.

SOC-2103: Africa, Latin America and globalization (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the historical development of social structures and political institutions in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America in the global economy. Comparative study of the genesis and effects of globalization on state policies. Social change (inequality, poverty, labor market, social movements) in rural and urban areas.

SOC-2108: Sociology of social movements (3 credits)

Description

What is a social movement? Can humans really make history, to change society? How walking movements: development stages, mobilization, organization, participation? Many examples: environmentalism, feminism, labor movement. What are the methodological problems related to the study of these movements?

SOC-2114: Environment and Society (3 credits)

Description

Study of the relationship between nature and societies. Representations of nature. Genesis of the ecological thought. Environmental issues: water, forests, air, ocean energy. Science and politics of global environmental problems: climate change, biodiversity. The environmental movement: origin, diversification, actions and impacts. Environmental policies and sustainable development.

SOC-2135: Private Life in modernity (3 credits)

Description

Taking as a framework for thinking development of individualism and the increasing recognition spaces in contemporary Western societies, this course aims to analyze the transformations of intimacy and articulation of private and public spaces in the context of modernity. Based on a set of empirical studies amongst others on the body and modesty, domestic space, sexual roles, marital relations and public display of intimacy, we reflect on the socially constructed nature of practices of private space as well as how these are articulated in the social space. The course is also an opportunity to introduce the student to reflect on methods and investigative strategies by which these areas can be addressed which, by nature, most often to escape direct observation.

STT-1000: Probability and Statistics (3 credits)

Description

Probability theory. Laws for discrete and continuous variables. Bivariate discrete laws. Descriptive statistics. Point estimation and confidence interval. Tests of parametric assumptions one and two populations. Analysis of variance. Regression and correlation. The study of the concepts of continuous random variables is done using the calculus.

TXM-1002: Theories of addiction and models (3 credits)

Description

This course aims comprehensive review of all etiologic models addiction. It addresses the disease model, prohibition, models: moral, behavioral, cognitive, biopsychosocial, genetics and many others. In addition to a description of these models, a critical analysis of past and current theories is presented. Finally, this course offers study and highlights the beliefs of the student to tackle drug abuse and drug addicts.

TXM-2103: Drug abuse and psychiatric disorders (3 credits)

Description

This course aims the comprehensive review of the different mental disorders experienced concurrently with addiction problems. Among the relevant subjects include the classification of psychiatric disorders (DSM-IV); clinical description of the main problems of the axis I and II (psychoses, mood and anxiety disorders, personality disorders, etc.); diagnostic principles and difficulties of the differential diagnosis; the main epidemiological data and the many research findings addressing comorbidity. This course also discusses the difficulties inherent in this comorbidity and treatment focusing particularly problematic doubles. Finally, many practical cases (clinical vignettes, case history) are exposed.

MNG-MNG-1000 and 1001 courses are also available in English: MNG-MNG-1002 and 1103 

REQUIREMENT 3-12 AMONG CREDITS

CRI-1002: Society and Criminal Justice (3 credits)

Description

Understanding the complexity of criminal justice by the comparative analysis and critical thinking. Presentation of theoretical currents, criminal justice models and key anchors of the criminal justice process (concept of justice, ideological foundations, media, public opinion, discretion, ethics, etc.).

CRI-1003: Deviance, delinquency, crime (3 credits)

Description

This course defines the subject of criminology and distinguishes the basic concepts of the discipline. It allows more precisely to know the different explanatory approaches and understanding of deviance and delinquency; to understand the peculiarities of certain criminal groups; to control the operation of the criminal justice system; to grasp the extent of crime in Haiti; to understand how the standards, rules, structures and social organizations contribute to the neutralization, the emergence and maintenance of deviance and delinquency; and finally, to develop critical thinking in relation to theoretical and empirical foundations of criminology.

CRI-2015: Principles of intervention with involuntary clients (3 credits)

Description

The general objective of this course is to develop in students a critical sense of the intervention with clients say no volunteers or in a situation of authority. Ethical and professional issues using coercion, challenges related to informed consent, roles of assistance and control, intervention principles associated with different backgrounds: institutional juvenile, adult and community corrections.

CRI-2114: Social Expertise at court (3 credits)

Description

Integration of theoretical principles and practices of criminological expertise in judicial context. Skill development in criminological expertise in court. Understanding the different laws and ethical framework that govern the work of expertise. Various social assessments specific to the criminologist labor (adult and juvenile delinquency, sentence report, etc.). Planned visit to the courthouse.

CRI-2117: Drugs, crime and addictions (3 credits)

Description

This course looks at the phenomenon of addiction in general, and particularly the links between addiction and crime. It deals in particular the role of the state and social policies with regard to these phenomena; their social representations and explanatory models throughout history; and their effects, both individual and collective. It helps to be familiar with the scope of the intervention in the field of addiction, specifically criminalized with customers.

CRI-3000: sociocriminologiques Theories (3 credits)

Description

This course introduces the student to the main criminological theories of sociological approach. Chicago school, functionalism, differential association, labeling, critical criminology. Application to various problems of social control and crime reduction.

SVS-1100: Behavior and Social Environment (3 credits)

Description

Objective: to use as part of the psychological analysis of the individual elements, which are necessary to understand the interaction person-environment, proper object of social work. Content: components of theories of ego, behavior modification, humanistic approach and theories of the physical and social environment appropriate to the study of interactions person-environment.

SVS-1101: Study of communities (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce students in the study process of a community. Content: changing concept of community; methodologies in the study of communities; community types: urban district, rural community in transition, cultural community, ethnic community, multicultural community, vertical patterns and horizontal community; functions: production, distribution, consumption, socialization, social control, social participation, mutual support. Communities disintegration. Application in Haiti: monographic study of a community made by students.

SVS-1102: Poverty and underdevelopment (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: acquire theoretical and empirical knowledge about the dual problem of poverty and development as well as the intervention in this matter. Content: the meaning and measurement of poverty; the prevalence and dynamics of poverty in Haiti and in the developed and developing; individual and collective consequences of poverty; public policy; different routes of social service intervention on poverty and development.

SVS-1103: Intervention Field: Health (3 credits)

Description

Inform and educate the student’s field of what particular health, and that, from a critical perspective of application of social work practice.

SVS-1108: Intervention Field: Gerontology (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: knowledge of the problems of old age; fitness for aid intervention with the elderly. Content: gerontology. The aging phenomenon as a biological, psychological and sociological. Protection. Home support. Institutionalization. Mental Health. Autonomy. Problems of identity and belonging.

SVS-1109: Field of intervention: family (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce students to the problems of the family; develop analytical and intervention skills in family problems. Content: the structures and dynamics family news. The services offered to the family. The place and role of social service. Changes in services. Elements of a family policy. The family intervention group and collective. The genogram and systemic card. Application to various family problems.

SVS-1110: Field of intervention: childhood and adolescence (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce the student to the attention of social services for children and youth. Content: historical perspective; legal, organization of the network of social services for children and youth; theoretical models; Main problems faced by children and adolescents and actions attached to it in social work.

SVS-1111: Prevention and social services (3 credits)

Description

Objective: to understand the different dimensions of prevention and its application lie in social services. Contents: description of the concept of prevention, determination of favorable policies and services for the establishment of a preventive practice values to preventive practice, determination of the methodologies used in prevention, project development, description and critique of current programs .

SVS-1112: Feminist Social Work and Analysis (3 credits)

Description

Objective: awareness of the status of women in Haitian society and learn about feminist intervention. Contents: history of the women’s movement; foundations, objectives and strategies of the feminist intervention; role and specific actions in different spheres of the social services (family violence, mental health, poverty, immigration, etc.).

SVS-1113: social and community resources policies (3 credits)

Description

Objective: in this course, it is proposed to make an overview of social policy and of resources for Haiti elderly. Contents: current social policy, social security measures, public and private social services, development of policies and services.

SVS-1115: Special Topic I (3 credits)

Description

Objective: enable the student to know and to deepen a current practices in social work. According to the most common social problems, the course content can be changed each year.

SVS-1117: Intervention in intercultural context (3 credits)

Description

This course aims an understanding of immigration policies in a historical perspective: issues related to refugees and immigrants. It also identifies the specific nature of the intervention in an intercultural context.

SVS-1119: Management of Community Organizations (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the key dimensions of management as practiced in community organizations: types, sectors of intervention, responsibilities, administrative processes, planning and programming, human resources, financial management, material organization , operation.

SVS-1120: Social Intervention and Economy (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To provide basic knowledge to understand the scope and limits of this field of action. Contents: review of the history and concepts that define the characteristics of the social economy, examining its relationship with the community economic development, introduction to different schools of thought regarding the relationship between this type of intervention and poverty analysis criticism of social economy projects in terms of the conditions for their implementation.

SVS-1122: Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: fill the training needs of professionals working in community settings (community organizations, CLSC) or institutional (foster homes, shelters and hospitals for long-term care) with elderly people at risk of to abuse and neglect. Creating stakeholder awareness of abuse and neglect phenomena and indicate the appropriate interventions based on the concepts of “empowerment”.

SVS-2100: Hands: Summer Job (3 credits)

Description

Students enrolled in this course has the obligation to follow half past three in the training placement service of the GOC University The position held shall be paid.

PROFILES OF STUDY

Entrepreneurial profile

ENT-1000: Know undertake: the passion to create and act (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course in entrepreneurship is for any student in the first cycle. It aims to develop a sense of initiative and entrepreneurship in students, to help them discover and exploit its full entrepreneurial potential. The knowledge imparted to students relate to both the entrepreneur and the creative process by which he leads his project to fruition, be it a social project, commercial, cooperative, artistic or otherwise. Concrete examples are given to illustrate the passion of entrepreneurs, their need to create and innovate and action orientation. Available in class or distance, the course plays a key role in the development of entrepreneurial skills. The course includes the realization of an entrepreneurial sketch to sensitize the students to the realities of an entrepreneurial project and develop a more just vision of the challenges to be considered. The sketch is not a comprehensive business plan, the progress of the course remains primarily the discovery and development of the entrepreneurial potential of the student and not the creation of a company.

ENT-3000: Entrepreneurial Portfolio I (3 credits)

Description

The student must be admitted to the entrepreneurial profile, Certificate in Entrepreneurship and SME management or firmware developing entrepreneurial skills and detain or above average 2.67 calculated on 24 credits or more in a program to register in this activity. The entrepreneurial portfolio allows students to develop a project related to their field of study, to establish a network of contacts and thus improve their entrepreneurial skills. Personalized support is provided by frequent meetings with a counselor Entrepreneurship throughout the project development period. Coaching facilitates the process by allowing the student to validate and deepen their project idea, to focus its efforts and develop its action plan.

ENT-3010: Entrepreneurial Portfolio II (3 credits)

Description

The student must be admitted to the entrepreneurial profile, Certificate in Entrepreneurship and SME management or firmware developing entrepreneurial skills and detain or above average 2.67 calculated on 24 credits or more in a program to register in this activity. The entrepreneurial portfolio allows students to develop a project related to their field of study, to establish a network of contacts and thus improve their entrepreneurial skills. Personalized support is provided by frequent meetings with a counselor Entrepreneurship throughout the project development period. Coaching facilitates the process by allowing the student to validate and deepen their project idea, to focus its efforts and develop its action plan.

RULE 1-3 AMONG CREDITS

SVS-1119: Management of Community Organizations (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the key dimensions of management as practiced in community organizations: types, sectors of intervention, responsibilities, administrative processes, planning and programming, human resources, financial management, material organization , operation.

SVS-1120: Social Intervention and Economy (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To provide basic knowledge to understand the scope and limits of this field of action. Contents: review of the history and concepts that define the characteristics of the social economy, examining its relationship with the community economic development, introduction to different schools of thought regarding the relationship between this type of intervention and poverty analysis criticism of social economy projects in terms of the conditions for their implementation.

International Profile

EHE-1SVS: Studies – International profile – Bachelor of Social Work (12 to 18 credits)

Description

Activities carried out in a university abroad, under international profile, which will be equivalencies student record upon presentation of the official transcript of the activities.

Sustainability Profile

Profile of sustainable development is the ideal course for the student who wants to deepen his knowledge in the application of sustainable development concepts and the understanding of its issues. It aims to promote an interdisciplinary experience in solving problems while allowing the student to develop skills related to sustainable development and the field of study. The profile consists of 12 credits, 3 credits for the DDU-1000 required course Fundamentals of Sustainable Development, 3 credits for specialized courses related to the discipline of the student’s program, 6 credits may take the form of an internship , an intervention project or one or two specialized courses selected from a predetermined list.

DDU-1000: Foundations for Sustainable Development (3 credits)

Description

This introductory course to sustainable development is for all undergraduate student. It is to provide an introduction to the concept of different sizes and the implementation of sustainable development tools. It allows the student to acquire the basic elements of a general reflection on sustainable development, which takes into account its many ambiguities and difficulties in its operationalization. In addition, this course encourages thinking about the tools necessary for his apprehension as social project. This interdisciplinary course is delivered remotely to autumn sessions, winter and summer. This course is mandatory sustainability profile.

RULE 1-3 AMONG CREDITS

SVS-1101: study of communities (3 credits)

Description

Objective: To introduce students in the study process of a community. Content: changing concept of community; methodologies in the study of communities; community types: urban district, rural community in transition, cultural community, ethnic community, multicultural community, vertical patterns and horizontal community; functions: production, distribution, consumption, socialization, social control, social participation, mutual support. Communities disintegration. Application in Haiti: monographic study of a community made by students.

SVS-1102: Poverty and underdevelopment (3 credits)

Description

Objectives: acquire theoretical and empirical knowledge about the dual problem of poverty and development as well as the intervention in this matter. Content: the meaning and measurement of poverty; the prevalence and dynamics of poverty in haiti and in developed and developing; individual and collective consequences of poverty; public policy; different routes of social service intervention on poverty and development.

SVS-1119: Management of Community Organizations (3 credits)

Description

This course aims to introduce students to the key dimensions of management as practiced in community organizations: types, sectors of intervention, responsibilities, administrative processes, planning and programming, human resources, financial management, material organization , operation.

RULE 2-6 AMONG CREDITS

ANT-2304: Anthropology and Development (3 credits)

Description

Anthropological approaches to development and its multiple dimensions examined in terms of globalization, modernity, and links between the “local” and “global”. Specificity of the anthropological approach, both in terms of issues than on methods. Thematic debates.

GGR-1005: Human Geography: population, environment, development (3 credits)

Description

Introduction to the study of the relationship between human societies, their economic activities and geographical areas. The development, its manifestations and problems. The consequences on the environment. Environmental problems and their impact on the economy. Links between the different spatial scales (local, regional, national, international).

PHI-1116: Philosophy of Nature (3 credits)

Description

Study of some conceptions of nature (especially those of Aristotle, Descartes and Whitehead) for passing the student to a more or less commonplace vision, naive or romantic nature, to design an informed, thoughtful depth and different realities directly or indirectly related to the idea of nature. Highlighting a few fundamental problems and some essential evidence. The question of interiority and purpose in nature; the phenomenon of consciousness; the time and motion; the opposition nature-culture; nature and ecology.

SOC-2114: Environment and Society (3 credits)

Description

Study of the relationship between nature and societies. Representations of nature. Genesis of the ecological thought. Environmental issues: water, forests, air, ocean energy. Science and politics of global environmental problems: climate change, biodiversity. The environmental movement: origin, diversification, actions and impacts. Environmental policies and sustainable development.
Course Information
  • Course Id:SVS
Instructors